Part I: Organizing Blocks and Block Captains

 

In my role as an emergency preparedness coordinator for my neighborhood, I have had the opportunity to plan and execute a few neighborhood communication drills. The lead article is the first in a series of articles related to organizing a neighborhood in such a way that a full-scale emergency drill can be executed. 

In each of the neighborhood exercises I have been a part of, I have learned something that helps me to refine my own neighborhood’s communication plan. 

Here is a list of the articles that you will read in upcoming issues: 

1. Organizing blocks & captains 

2. Color-codes of emergencies 

3. FRS radio protocol 

4. Executing the drill 

By the end of 2011, we hope to provide you with the information necessary to better organize your neighborhoods so you can test this organization through a communication drill and customize it to better prepare your neighbors and friends for anything that may come your way. 

Jason M. Carlton

Neighborhood Preparedness 

How often do you see a news story about a disaster that occurred and sent the city into panic and disorganization? Having a practiced and refined emergency preparedness plan in place can help reduce the panic in your own neighborhood.

It would be naive to say that in an actual emergency, your plan will go exactly as planned and practiced – every disaster may warrant different circumstances. But if the residents feel confident that a plan is in place, and has been practiced before, the level of panic will remain much lower.

If you fail to plan, then you plan to fail. Don’t let this be your neighborhood.

STEP 1: Identify a block captain 

Block captains are volunteers assigned to a designated collection of houses and who help gather the information necessary to identify and address the needs of that given neighborhood.

Ideally, the block captain should be able to stand in front of their house and see the houses to which they have been assigned. In the corresponding graphic, a few examples of block organizations have been identified, with the block captain’s home identified in white.

 

STEP 2: Provide basic training 

When asking a neighbor to “volunteer” to be a block captain, it is important to be able to provide them with an understanding of what their role is in an emergency.

Layton City (Utah) prepared a PowerPoint presentation for block captain training and has made it available on their Website. You can access the PDF file with this link:

http://bit.ly/TrainBlockCapts 

Once your block captains have been organized, hold a meeting with as many block captains as possible so they can meet each other and start to develop the “team” mentality needed in an emergency. 

CONCLUSION

Organization will be key. It may take some time to organize the block captains, and they may change as time goes by, but this is the first step in preparing your neighborhood for an emergency.

Block Captains

August 2011, Every Needful Thing                                                                 Jason M. Carlton

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