Calling 9-1-1

Everyone should know what to in an Emergency.  Whenever there is an emergency, use the following tips to help decide if you should call 9-1-1 (or local emergency number) for an ambulance.

911 should be called IMMEDIATELY for any emergency which is threatening to life, health, safety, or property. This includes crimes in progress, medical problems, suspicious persons or activities. Fire emergencies, criminal offenses, drug activity, and domestic problems should also be promptly reported to 9-1-1.

Non-emergency requests for service should be directed to an administrative number. Add your local number to your emergency contacts. Listen to the recorded options and select the line # for non emergency. Stay on the line until a dispatcher answers.

 

Call if victim…

… is trapped

… is not responding or is passed out

… is bleeding badly or bleeding cannot be stopped

… has a cut or wound so bad and deep that you can see bone or muscles

… has a body part missing or is torn away

… has pain below the rib cage that does not go away

… is peeing, pooping or puking blood (called passing blood)

… is breathing weird or having trouble breathing

… seems to have hurt their head, neck or back

… is jerking uncontrollably (called having a seizure)

… has broken bones and cannot be moved carefully

… acts like they had a heart attack (chest pain or pressure)

… If you call 9-1-1 there may be a recording or delay while your call is being processed. DO NOT HANG UP — wait for a 9-1-1 dispatcher.

When you talk to 9-1-1 or the emergency number…

… try to stay CALM and describe what happened and what is wrong with the victim

… give the location of the emergency, your name and the phone number you are calling from

… follow their instructions in case they tell you what to do for the victim

… do NOT hang up until the 9-1-1 operator tells you to.

Since you are calling from a cell phone, your call may be disconnected if the signal is lost. Be sure to call back if you are cut off.

… When calling 9-1-1 on a cellular phone, be sure to stop if you are in a moving vehicle. It is difficult to obtain all of the information needed if you are getting further from the emergency.

Calling 9-1-1

by Bill and Janet Liebsch

… Your call may need to be transferred to another agency because cell phone calls are sent to a 9-1-1 answering point based on cell radio coverage. Cell coverage areas don’t always match political boundaries, so most calls are routed to a 9-1-1 answering point that serves the majority of the area.

 

Reproduced with Permission:

http://www.ItsaDisaster.net  from “It’s a Disaster …and what are YOU gonna do about it?”, by Bill and Janet Liebsch

 

Morgan County, TN ”911 Tips” version of above

 

TIPS ON GOOD SAMARITAN LAWS

     The definition of a “Samaritan” is a charitable or helpful person. Most states have Good Samaritan laws that were designed to protect citizens who try to help injured victims with emergency care. If a citizen uses “logical” or “rational” actions while making wise or careful decisions during an emergency situation then they can be protected from being sued.

To learn more about your state’s Good Samaritan laws, check with your local library, search the web or contact an attorney.

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