Will the Paramedics Make It?

Israeli dressing Paramedic Multi-Purpose Wound Dressing

We can all be prepared to take the initiative to save a life, should we be faced with a life or death situation. Here are three critical first aid procedures that can be accomplished with one dressing.

Israeli Bandage – invented by an Israeli military medic and manufactured in Israel, these bandages are designed to stop blood loss in non-fatally wounded people. Since the tactic for caring for wounded on the spot has become a life saving technique, the Israeli dressing is the bandage of choice of US military medics, emergency medical services and law enforcement personnel.  Available in 4, 6 and 8” wide, this bandage has a sterile non-adhering dressing that can be removed without reopening the wound. A pressure plate  is placed directly over the wound to stop bleeding. The wrapping techniques applies pressure.

It also has a C clamp to hold the bandage closed without tape that can be secured by a simple sliding motion with one hand. This can be self applied.  The Israeli bandage can be used as a splint with the addition of a straight solid object to keep the broken limb immobilized or serve as a partial tourniquet. One form of this bandage has two pads to deal with through and through wounds. The exit wound often bleeds more profusely than the entrance, so place the largest pad over the exit wound and adjust the second to cover the entrance wound. Watch this training video.

Add Wound Dressings to Your First Aid Kit

 

Additional Articles in the April 2014 Issue:

  • A reminder to review and rotate three types of items in your 72 hour emergency kit.
  • A discussion of the importance of “duck and cover” in surviving a nuclear attack
  • What are your plans to provide protein in your diet in an emergency situation? Here are some items to add to your supplies
  • Are members of your family hearing impaired that might not hear a smoke alarm?
  • Our featured contributor this month is Tess Pennington of ReadyNutrition.com. She shares an article about Bio Mass Briquettes. Now you’ll have an environmentally friendly use for those shredded documents.
  • Sun Ovens are a perfect partner for bio mass briquettes, here’s how …
  • Some of our friends have complained that their yards were so shady that they doubted they could grow anything in a garden. In answer to their questions, here are some plants that can be grown in shade. Don’t give up on your yard either. Read more
  • Speaking of gardening, do you use Epsom salts? Here’s why.
  • Our Solar Chef has included a wonderful recipe for Solar Stuffed Shells. Give it a try, these are yummy.

Gardening with Epsom Salt

Billie Nicholson

      epsom saltDid your grand parents use Epsom salt for something more than a hot tub bath after a hard day’s work? In addition to human health and wellness, it can help garden plants thrive, too. Epsom salt, Magnesium Sulfate, gets it’s name from the town of Epsom, England, where it was first distilled from water in the late 1500’s. It works to correct a magnesium or sulfur deficiency in the soil as an “organic fertilizer.”

Magnesium is an essential element in the chlorophyll molecule that allows plants to be able to convert light into energy. Photosynthesis is the chemical process that makes this conversion of light into energy-rich glucose molecules using water and carbon dioxide. It is the basis for life.1  Magnesium aids in nitrogen and phosphorus absorption and helps seeds germinate. Sulfur is an ingredient in two of the amino acids, methionine and cysteine, necessary to synthesize proteins. It also aids in other nutrient absorption.  The chemical compound, magnesium sulfate, is a highly soluble soil amendment, which means it can be absorbed by plants through their leaves as well as through their roots. It is also pH neutral, so it will not alter the soil pH. It promotes growth, color and overall plant health.2

Before you plant, add one cup of Epsom salt to every 100 square feet of soil. Mix it in thoroughly. If you have already planted, lightly sprinkle it over the newly planted area and water in with a hose sprinkler. Once plants are established, make a liquid fertilizer mixture of one tablespoon Epsom Salt to each gallon of water and apply four times during the season.3 Tomatoes and peppers are prone to magnesium deficiency. Add a tablespoon or two per hole before planting seeds or transplants and supplement with the liquid as they grow and develop fruit.

Epsom salt can revitalize your garden. It does not cause a chemical build up in the soil or harm plants when used.  Many gardeners credit their garden success to Epsom salt applications.

References

  1. http://drsircus.com/medicine/magnesium/magnesium-the-lamp-of-life
  2. http://www.ehow.com/way_5714066_much-salt-should-put-plants_.html
  3. http://www.saltworks.us/gardening-with-epsom-salt.asp

 

Additional Articles in the April 2014 Issue:

  • A reminder to review and rotate three types of items in your 72 hour emergency kit.
  • A discussion of the importance of “duck and cover” in surviving a nuclear attack
  • What are your plans to provide protein in your diet in an emergency situation? Here are some items to add to your supplies
  • Are members of your family hearing impaired that might not hear a smoke alarm?
  • Our featured contributor this month is Tess Pennington of ReadyNutrition.com. She shares an article about Bio Mass Briquettes. Now you’ll have an environmentally friendly use for those shredded documents.
  • Sun Ovens are a perfect partner for bio mass briquettes, here’s how …
  • Some of our friends have complained that their yards were so shady that they doubted they could grow anything in a garden. In answer to their questions, here are some plants that can be grown in shade. Don’t give up on your yard either. Read more
  • We can all be prepared to take the initiative to save a life, should we be faced with a life or death situation. Here are three critical first aid procedures that can be accomplished with one dressing.
  • Our Solar Chef has included a wonderful recipe for Solar Stuffed Shells. Give it a try, these are yummy.

What Vegetables Grow in the Shade?

Some of our friends have complained that their yards were so shady that they doubted they could grow anything in a garden. In answer to their questions, here are some plants that can be grown in shade. Don’t give up on your yard either. Vegetables grown for their leaves, stems or buds can tolerate shade better than those grown for their fruit or roots, although some of these can tolerate light shade. Their size or yield may be affected, but they will still taste good.

Leaf LettuceLeaf Lettuce - is one of the first plants up in our garden each year. It thrives in soil of most any type, but does best in moisture retentive soil with some compost available. Our garden beds get partial shade from a neighbor’s oak trees. This has been a benefit as the summer temperatures rise. Lettuce often wants to bolt, or go to bloom, as the temperatures rise. One gardener suggested planting lettuce north of a row of sunflowers that can provide partial shade making the lettuce bear longer. You don’t have to wait until the plants get really large to begin harvesting. Cut the leaves individually with scissors. The plants will continue to produce new leaves. Leaves will get bitter as the plants begin to bloom.

 

Green OnionsGreen Onions - are cold hardy and can tolerate partial shade. We plant green onions starting in the fall in Pensacola and add a few more bulbs each month to assure we have green onions into summer. Good companions for onions are potatoes and lettuce. Cut the green tops for sauteing or garnishing. As they grow larger, the white bulbs can be harvested, too. Onions like a little organic fertilizer or compost. Harvest before the rainy season, they don’t like wet feet and will rot. Use them in potato dishes, with peas, and green beans or steam them in a foil packet on the grill. AllRecipes.com has a green onion pancake recipe.

swiss chardSwiss Chard - likes sun or partial shade and is hardy to about 20ºF. We planted some in January, right before the temperature dropped to 18ºF. We covered them with shade cloth. They suffered some brown edged leaves, but are recovering now. A member of the beet family, they can have green, yellow or red purple stems. Chard can be eaten raw when young in a green salad, added to smoothies, or sauteed in olive oil with garlic and crushed red pepper. This green is best when served immediately after picking. It is loaded with nutrients, second only to spinach. In addition to anti-oxidants, it can also help stabilize blood sugar levels and benefit the pancreas.

sugar snap peasSugar Snap Peas – are one of our most favorite veggies. When the pods start developing, we start hovering with anticipation. The edible pods go a lot farther than the pea seeds. We eat them in green salads, if we can get them to the table, and as part of a sauteed vegetable mix. Sugar snap peas need to be trellised and last longer if grown in light shade. Keep the soil moist. We sprinkle with liquid fertilizer, once they start blooming. Peas contain vitamin C, K, niacin and anti-oxidants. They have the best food value when eaten immediately after harvesting.

Billie Nicholson, Editor 2014

 

Additional Articles in the April 2014 Issue:

  • A reminder to review and rotate three types of items in your 72 hour emergency kit.
  • A discussion of the importance of “duck and cover” in surviving a nuclear attack
  • What are your plans to provide protein in your diet in an emergency situation? Here are some items to add to your supplies
  • Are members of your family hearing impaired that might not hear a smoke alarm?
  • Our featured contributor this month is Tess Pennington of ReadyNutrition.com. She shares an article about Bio Mass Briquettes. Now you’ll have an environmentally friendly use for those shredded documents.
  • Sun Ovens are a perfect partner for bio mass briquettes, here’s how …
  • Speaking of gardening, do you use Epsom salts? Here’s why.
  • We can all be prepared to take the initiative to save a life, should we be faced with a life or death situation. Here are three critical first aid procedures that can be accomplished with one dressing.
  • Our Solar Chef has included a wonderful recipe for Solar Stuffed Shells. Give it a try, these are yummy.

Sun Ovens and Bio Mass Briquettes: A Partnership

slow cooked stew Sun Ovens® are the perfect partner to work with bio mass briquettes on rainy or overcast days. Bio mass briquettes can be burned to begin food preparations on a grill or other open fire. When the food is at least half cooked it can be transferred to a Sun Oven® to complete the process. Even indoors the retained heat of the partially cooked food in the well-insulated Sun Oven® will allow it to be used as a retained heat cooker, often referred to as a Wonder Box.

In addition, the Sun Oven® can be used during the production of bio mass pellets to help the drying process. Just set the pellets in the Sun Oven®, turn one of the door latches inward and set the glass on top leaving a gap between the gasket and the glass to allow moisture to escape.

Additional Articles in the April 2014 Issue:
  • A reminder to review and rotate three types of items in your 72 hour emergency kit.
  • A discussion of the importance of “duck and cover” in surviving a nuclear attack
  • What are your plans to provide protein in your diet in an emergency situation? Here are some items to add to your supplies
  • Are members of your family hearing impaired that might not hear a smoke alarm?
  • Our featured contributor this month is Tess Pennington of ReadyNutrition.com. She shares an article about Bio Mass Briquettes. Now you’ll have an environmentally friendly use for those shredded documents.
  • Some of our friends have complained that their yards were so shady that they doubted they could grow anything in a garden. In answer to their questions, here are some plants that can be grown in shade. Don’t give up on your yard either. Read more
  • Speaking of gardening, do you use Epsom salts? Here’s why.
  • We can all be prepared to take the initiative to save a life, should we be faced with a life or death situation. Here are three critical first aid procedures that can be accomplished with one dressing.
  • Our Solar Chef has included a wonderful recipe for Solar Stuffed Shells. Give it a try, these are yummy.

You Bet Your Life: Check Your Smoke Alarm

Billie and Robert Nicholson

smoke alarm

Image: www.lowenlow.com

We are constantly bombarded with safety messages about checking the batteries in our smoke and carbon monoxide alarms. By this time most of us yawn and say, “yea, yea.” Yet we constantly read or hear of preventable deaths from fires that occur in homes without effective fire alarms. But sometimes just checking batteries and pushing the test button, especially when up close to the alarm, is just not enough.

As the population ages and as some of our veterans returning from war find, a lot of people experience hearing loss. Modern hearing aids are wonderful when worn during our busy day and evening events. But when bedtime comes we take off our hearing aids and go to sleep. Modern fire alarms emit a warning signal in the frequency range of around 3000 hertz (that’s two octaves above middle C on a piano.) According to the Fire Protection Research Foundation, the typical smoke alarm fails to wake up almost 50% of those with hearing loss.

For the person with hearing deficits, more effective smoke alarms include the Lifetone Bedside Fire Alarm and Clock (www.lifetonesafety.com), the Loudenlow Smoke Detector (www.loudenlow.com), and the Silent Call (www.silentcall.com). These special alarms have reported to wake up about 80% of hearing impaired sleepers.

For your safety and piece of mind do the following: Test your smoke alarm to be sure that it will wake you in your bed. Don’t depend on a strobe device. Strobes only alerted about 25% of sleepers. Consider purchasing an alarm that signals you in the low-pitched sound area, close to middle C on the piano and that includes one with a bed shaker.

A lot of people dream of their 15 minutes of fame. Don’t let your story end with “Died of Smoke Inhalation”. For more fun information on fire safety visit www.sparky.org  or  www.sparky.org/parents

Additional Articles in the April 2014 Issue:

  • A reminder to review and rotate three types of items in your 72 hour emergency kit.
  • A discussion of the importance of “duck and cover” in surviving a nuclear attack
  • What are your plans to provide protein in your diet in an emergency situation? Here are some items to add to your supplies
  • Our featured contributor this month is Tess Pennington of ReadyNutrition.com. She shares an article about Bio Mass Briquettes. Now you’ll have an environmentally friendly use for those shredded documents.
  • Sun Ovens are a perfect partner for bio mass briquettes, here’s how …
  • Some of our friends have complained that their yards were so shady that they doubted they could grow anything in a garden. In answer to their questions, here are some plants that can be grown in shade. Don’t give up on your yard either. Read more
  • Speaking of gardening, do you use Epsom salts? Here’s why.
  • We can all be prepared to take the initiative to save a life, should we be faced with a life or death situation. Here are three critical first aid procedures that can be accomplished with one dressing.
  • Our Solar Chef has included a wonderful recipe for Solar Stuffed Shells. Give it a try, these are yummy.

 

Alternative Protein Sources

What are your plans to provide alternative protein sources in an emergency situation?

As you collect canned goods don’t forget about this vital nutrient. The human body is nearly half protein, found in muscles, blood, antibodies and enzymes which make other body functions work. Often commercially processed meats are loaded with salt to enhance the flavor.  There are other sources. Here are some items to consider adding to your supplies.

  1. Nuts and Seeds – are high in protein and healthy fats. If you buy them prepackaged, they are ready to eat. They only last six months to a year, depending on the type of nut. Their high oil content reduces shelf life. Peanut butter is high in protein and available dried.
  2. Beans - are one of the longest cultivated plants, easy to digest and high in fiber. They also help maintain stable blood sugar levels by slowing the rate of carbohydrate absorption.1 Dried beans are economical and store well for an extended period of time. Store them in jars or mylar bags with oxygen absorbers. They will require water for presoaking before cooking, so plan ahead when preparing them. Cook with anise or coriander seeds to reduce flatulence as they’re digested by microbes in your intestine. There are lots of varieties for your culinary pleasure. Canned beans can be eaten right after opening, even cold in a power down situation.
  3. Chia Seeds - have double the amount of protein found in other seeds. Humans began eating chia seeds around 3500 BC. Aztecs and Mayans considered them magical because they increased stamina and energy over long periods. Chia seeds are high in fiber, omega fatty acids, calcium, and antioxidants as well. Because they absorb 12 times their weight, their expansion in your stomach will curb your appetite.
  4. Protein Powders – are available in three common forms, whey, soy and casein. Whey is the most popular because it is a water-soluble milk protein. It contains all nine amino acids necessary to build proteins in the human body. Soy has been favored by vegans, but recently it has been associated with altering estrogen balance. Casein powder is used with cheese production.
  5. Textured Vegetable Protein (TVP) - is produced from soy flour after the oil has been extracted. It is cooked under pressure, extruded and dried. Soy flour has a long shelf life if kept in a cool, dry place. With varying flavors added, it can taste like sausage, beef, ham, bacon or chicken. Easily rehydrated, it is economical and an excellent meat substitute or meal extender. One ounce of TVP is the equivalent of three ounces of meat.
  6. Freeze-dried Meat - has the water removed through sublimation, which turns water molecules into vapor. Freeze-drying food affects meat’s texture more than other preservation techniques. They are extremely light and easy to carry but more expensive to purchase. While some fruits taste great freeze-dried, meat will need to be rehydrated.
  7. Powdered Eggs and Milk – made by spray drying, the process removes nearly all of the water prohibiting the growth of microorganisms. Non-fat dried milk is best for long term storage.  Eggs are available as whole, yolks and whites. Store cool and dry. Refrigerate when opened.

Billie Nicholson, Editor 2014

References

1 http://readynutrition.com/resources/the-top-5-protein-sources-for-your-shtf-diet_27032013/

2 http://www.doctoroz.com/blog/lindsey-duncan-nd-cn/chia-ancient-super-secret

3 https://www.usaemergencysupply.com/information_center/all_about_textured_vegetable_protein.htm

Additional Articles in the April 2014 Issue:

  • A reminder to review and rotate three types of items in your 72 hour emergency kit.
  • A discussion of the importance of “duck and cover” in surviving a nuclear attack
  • Are members of your family hearing impaired that might not hear a smoke alarm?
  • Our featured contributor this month is Tess Pennington of ReadyNutrition.com. She shares an article about Bio Mass Briquettes. Now you’ll have an environmentally friendly use for those shredded documents.
  • Sun Ovens are a perfect partner for bio mass briquettes, here’s how …
  • Some of our friends have complained that their yards were so shady that they doubted they could grow anything in a garden. In answer to their questions, here are some plants that can be grown in shade. Don’t give up on your yard either. Read more …
  • Speaking of gardening, do you use Epsom salts? Here’s why.
  • We can all be prepared to take the initiative to save a life, should we be faced with a life or death situation. Here are three critical first aid procedures that can be accomplished with one dressing.
  • Our Solar Chef has included a wonderful recipe for Solar Stuffed Shells. Give it a try, these are yummy.

 

What is Civil Defense? Surviving a Nuclear Attack

600px-United_States_Civil_Defense_Roundel.svgBe Prepared for a Nuclear Disaster

Civil Defense is the organized non-military effort to prepare Americans for nuclear military attack. Over the past twenty years the term and training has been replaced by the Federal Emergency Management Agency, FEMA. Established in 1979 and absorbed into the Department of Homeland Security in 2003,1   the focus has shifted to protection against terrorism to create a safer, more secure America. This federal government organization provides the coordinated federal response in the event of a terrorist attack. According to their website, they are tasked with coordinating a response to any large natural disaster or other emergency event to  facilitate a swift and effective recovery effort.2 Examples of their work include restoration along the East and Gulf Coast following hurricanes Sandy and Katrina. Their biggest strengths lie in an ability to unify the effort, find the needed assets to solve a problem and eventually get the work done.DHS.gov

A big question remains. What if someone slips through the layers of surveillance and security and launches a “nuclear attack”?  What do we do?

What Happens in a Nuclear Disaster?

There are six types of nuclear disasters: dirty bombs, nuclear plant meltdowns, fallout from another country’s atomic bomb explosion, a singular nuclear strike in the US, a suitcase nuke, and all out war. There are three parts to nuclear explosions: the explosion with its initial bright flash of light and heat as mega tons of energy are released accompanied in a few seconds by a debris-filled pressure wave followed by alpha, beta and gamma radiation or chemical dust also know as fallout.  If you see a bright flash, don’t run to the window to see what’s coming next. It will be the shattering glass from the window you’re looking out.

Your first response should be duck and cover. Find the closest solid structure and duck down, covering your head with your arms. If there is no structure near, lay flat on the ground, face down. Stay down for at least 30 seconds.3 A blast wave and wind traveling at the speed of sound or about 5 seconds per mile will follow. A huge blast may cause temporary blindness resulting in disorientation. When you can, move to a protected place that is not damaged. Immediately cover your nose and mouth with an article of clothing to reduce the chance of breathing in smoke or radioactive dust.  Stay away from windows because the blast wave will blow out windows and some walls. Gamma rays travel so fast you can’t avoid them. Anyone within one thousand feet of a detonation will most likely be killed. If you survived, get inside. Once inside, remove your outer layer of clothing and shower and wash your hair as soon as possible. Discard all these items. This will remove up to 90% of contaminants. If you develop nausea and vomiting within 4 hours after the blast, chances are you have permanent damage. There are some medical processes that can help if you can get to a location offering them.

After the blast, the fallout is deadly.  Get as far inside a structure as possible and have as much material above you as possible to block the beta radiation. Dust contaminated with radiation will be everywhere. Below ground shelters are best if they are three feet below the surface. Dust will travel with the prevailing winds. The majority of contamination will have fallen in three days. When you are ready to evacuate, cover as much of you as possible. Use a mask, gloves and wear eye protection. Duct tape your sleeves and pant legs. Remove and discard this clothing before reentering a shelter. If you travel, go in a perpendicular direction to the wind flow. Begin to take iodine tablets immediately to prevent thyroid damage. The non-radioactive iodine saturates the thyroid gland so it can’t absorb radioactive iodine. If you don’t have tablets, apply betadine to the skin of your abdomen and arms for 3-5 days. Stored food and water will be critical. Make sure you have some.4

References:

1 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_civil_defense

2 http://www.dhs.gov/building-resilient-nation

3.https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QhDi0zoTcSo

4 http://www.alertsusa.com/reports/goodnews.pdf

 

Additional Articles in the April 2014 Issue:

  • A reminder to review and rotate three types of items in your 72 hour emergency kit.
  • What are your plans to provide protein in your diet in an emergency situation? Here are some items to add to your supplies …
  • Are members of your family hearing impaired that might not hear a smoke alarm?
  • Our featured contributor this month is Tess Pennington of ReadyNutrition.com. She shares an article about Bio Mass Briquettes. Now you’ll have an environmentally friendly use for those shredded documents.
  • Sun Ovens are a perfect partner for bio mass briquettes, here’s how …
  • Some of our friends have complained that their yards were so shady that they doubted they could grow anything in a garden. In answer to their questions, here are some plants that can be grown in shade. Don’t give up on your yard either. Read more …
  • Speaking of gardening, do you use Epsom salts? Here’s why.
  • We can all be prepared to take the initiative to save a life, should we be faced with a life or death situation. Here are three critical first aid procedures that can be accomplished with one dressing.
  • Our Solar Chef has included a wonderful recipe for Solar Stuffed Shells. Give it a try, these are yummy.

 

 

72 Hour Kit Rotation Required

72 hour kitTime to Check Your 72 Hour Kit

In the September 2013 “Every Needful Thing” newsletter, we included a list of items to pack in an emergency escape bag, AKA your 72-hour kit. Hope you made one!  We included some things that can last a long time and others that have a shorter storage time. This month is a good time to pull out the bag and review it’s contents.

  1. Exchange the food - Did you pack some granola bars and cracker packets? How about some nuts or peanut butter items? Many of these items contain oil of one kind or another that oxidizes or goes “rancid” if kept for over six months. Take out your snacks and eat them – or at least taste them to determine if they are still fit to eat. As you eat them, add these items to a list as a reminder to replace them on your next shopping trip.  It’s a real disappointment to open one of these packs and find them yucky. Can you imagine how bad you would feel if you were in an emergency situation and that is all you had to eat? Do you have an 72-hour kit for your children? Are they still eating those “chicken sticks”? Have their favorite snacks changed? Staying up to date on their  favorites will make a disruptive situation a little more comfortable.
  2. Check clothing sizes - This is a good idea for adults as well as children. Kids are always growing and changing sizes, so make adjustments by including some currently fitting and well used clothes for them.  Since disasters can happen any time of the year, a bag of extra jackets for snow or lighter weight clothes for warmer weather is a good idea. Adults, include some extra socks, “sweats” or jeans and long sleeve shirts that can be rolled up if necessary,. Rain ponchos are a must, how does yours look?
  3. Rotate Batteries & Medicines - Do you have battery operated items like two way radios or flash lights in your kit? Batteries leak when stored for a long time and can ruin the item they’re in.  Remember to store batteries separately. Prescriptions have expirations. Rotate these, too.

Keep Your 72 Hour Kit Updated

Additional Articles in the April 2014 Issue:

  • A discussion of the importance of “duck and cover” in surviving a nuclear attack
  • What are your plans to provide protein in your diet in an emergency situation? Here are some items to add to your supplies …
  • Are members of your family hearing impaired that might not hear a smoke alarm?
  • Our featured contributor this month is Tess Pennington of ReadyNutrition.com. She shares an article about Bio Mass Briquettes. Now you’ll have an environmentally friendly use for those shredded documents.
  • Sun Ovens are a perfect partner for bio mass briquettes, here’s how …
  • Some of our friends have complained that their yards were so shady that they doubted they could grow anything in a garden. In answer to their questions, here are some plants that can be grown in shade. Don’t give up on your yard either. Read more …
  • Speaking of gardening, do you use Epsom salts? Here’s why.
  • We can all be prepared to take the initiative to save a life, should we be faced with a life or death situation. Here are three critical first aid procedures that can be accomplished with one dressing.
  • Our Solar Chef has included a wonderful recipe for Solar Stuffed Shells. Give it a try, these are yummy.

 

 

Tuna Casserole from Food Storage

Tuna CasseroleTuna Casserole

All the ingredients in this recipe came from food storage. We rotated out the oldest items from our shelves. On a 70 degree day, the sun came out in the afternoon. We started this at 3:30PM and cooked it until 5:30PM. Temperature held at 300 degrees. The casserole was nice and bubbly hot throughout and the flavors were well blended.

Ingredients

3 – 5 oz White tuna canned in water, drained
1 – 12 oz. can cream of mushroom soup
2 – 15 oz cans of baby peas, drained
16 oz. macaroni or wide egg noodles, pre-boiled
2 TBS capers
1 – 4 oz. jar pimentos
15 oz. mayonaise
White pepper to taste

Directions

Preheat the Sun Oven® while mixing the ingredients. Mix the ingredients lightly in a bowl. Place in a greased casserole dish and top with Italian bread crumbs. Bake in the Sun Oven for two hours ’til hot and bubbly. These ingredients will make two 9×12″ casseroles. Cook one today and save the other in your refrigerator for a couple of days. It will be welcome a second time.

Clear Thinking During a Life or Death Situation

Travis Haley of Haley Strategic Partners, LLC,  presented a thought provoking interview during the 2014 Survival Summit about training your mind to think clearly during a life or death scenario. These are some of his comments. If you plan to be in the 1% who are prepared during an emergency, you will need to be able to pull the trigger on another person. You can pick up the pieces of most mistakes, but not when you take another life. In his business Travis trains people to become a better tactical shooter, but there is more to survival than just pulling a trigger.

The best warrior is one who cares so strongly that his fight comes from deep within.

He is adaptive and agile, builds his confidence, controls impulses and learns to recover.  There are three parts of the mind: cognitive, affective, and conative. The cognitive part of the brain measures intelligence, the affective deals with emotions and the conative drives how someone acts upon his thoughts and feelings.The first step in becoming the best warrior is to learn who you are. One way to do this it to take the Kolbe Index test. We each have a unique set of innate strengths and talents that remain unchanged from birth. We have equal amounts of conative energy for engaging the thinking (cognitive) and the feeling (affective) parts of the mind to produce purposeful actions. For all test-phobic readers, there are no wrong answers. This test measures behaviors driven by your instinct, not your personality or IQ. Once you know yourself, you will be able to see what you’re really good at. That’s the tactical.

The next step is understanding kinesthetic awareness.

How do you perceive movement? The best warrior develops a keen awareness of his/her environment. Practice seeing things before they happen. Here’s a good way to practice this: open doors for someone in need. Millions of repetitions built in your mind will help you make a better decision under stressful situations.

In stressful situations, the warrior asks: “What has happened that I don’t know about?” It’s a good idea to set up situations that require decision making under stress. You will soon learn that there are no absolutes, things will change quickly and you will need to become adaptive and illusive.There are seven levels of warrior training:

  • Why are you choosing what you do? Tactically – technically – work on mental focus drills.
  • Learn about bio-mechanical movements through other sporting activities.
  • Focus on achieving excellence in one thing at a time; figure out the processes to achieve this.
  • You must learn as much as possible about everything; need to be a quick starter and find out what you’re good at doing; in group situations, tasks will be assigned accordingly.
  • Always have accountability for your actions – did you manifest this reality?
  • Remember the law of attraction; make a bad situation your new normal; think about solutions to the existing situation.

Are you interested in conative thinking practice ? There’s a card game for this: ConflictedTheGame.com 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Conation                                                                                           Reproduced with Permission

corin