Young Women’s Group Gets Sun Oven® Cooking Lesson

Solar Cooking LessonsOur Young Women’s group planned a “Tea” for their moms. Solar cooking was one of the lessons required for their preparations for Girls Camp coming up later this summer. So they decided they could learn how to bake the cookies planned for dessert in a solar oven. Robert and I set up the Sun Oven® to pre heat while the girls mixed the cookie dough  and took turns spooning it onto the parchment paper covered baking racks. By the time everyone had eaten finger sandwiches and yummy potato salad, the cookies were ready to serve with a scoop of vanilla ice cream. “It gets a lot hotter than I expected,” said one of the young ladies. There were no leftovers.

Billie Nicholson, editor
May 2015

Disaster Plans for Pets

Humane Society

disaster plan for petsWhen preparing for an emergency situation, don’t forget to make plans for any family pets. Just like any other family member, pets are your responsibility, too. Here are some ideas to help you create your disaster plan to care for their basic needs. 

  1. Don’t wait until the last minute, start your plan now. Make sure your pet is wearing a collar and identification tag that is up to date and visible at all times. Getting a micro chip inserted will greatly increase your chance of being reunited should your pet get lost. If your pet is adopted from a shelter or rescue organization, make sure the registration has been transferred to you. Add your cell phone number to the tag as well.
  1. Put together a disaster kit to include:
      Food and water for at least 5 days, bowl, and a manual can opener if you are packing canned pet food. Keep an extra gallon of water on hand to use if your pet has been exposed to chemicals or flood waters and needs to be rinsed.
      Medications and medical records stored in a waterproof container and a pet first-aid kit and book.
      Cat litter box, litter, scoop and garbage bags to collect all your pet’s waste.
      Sturdy leashes, harnesses and carriers to transport pets safely and to avoid run-aways.
      Current photos of you with your pets and a written description to help others identify them.
      Written information about your pet’s feeding schedule, medical conditions and behavior issues along with the name and contact information for your veterinarian in case you have to board or put them in foster care.
      Grooming items, newspapers or paper towels for clean ups.
  2. Find a safe place to stay. Be sure to check your local shelters and select ones that allow for pets. This includes checking with hotels and motels that might be along your evacuation route.
  3. Plan for your pets in case you’re not home or can’t get there by asking a trusted neighbor or nearby family member or friend to take your pets and meet you at a specified location.
  4. If you must wait out a storm at home, decide on a safe area of your home where you can all stay together. Pet-proof the area. Bring your pet inside as soon as local authorities announce trouble is coming. Put all your emergency supplies in your safe-room. Stay inside until the “all clear” sign.
  5. Following an emergency event don’t allow your pets to roam loose. They can get disoriented, lost or hurt in some situations.
  6. Be aware of the dangers high temperatures can cause for your pets. Heatstroke can be fatal. Apply cold towels to pet’s head, neck and chest; let her lick ice cubes and go to the vet immediately.

Billie Nicholson, editor
May 2015

Tips to Prepare for Blackouts!

The National Preparedness Community

Blackout tipsWhat is a Power Grid?

The power grid consists of a set of large power plants connected together by wires. It works well as a power-distribution system because it allows for energy sharing. Interestingly, there is no storage in the system. As power is demanded by consumers, that same amount is generated and distributed. This works great until there is a failure in part of the system that other parts can’t fill in.  Then they fail and a domino effect leaves a large area in the dark.

Follow these tips to be prepared for a blackout:

  • Practice energy conservation measures to reduce electricity usage, acquire flashlights and batteries, solar lights, candles or oil lamps for lighting & alternative cooking devices (like a Sun Oven®.)
  • Always have a large cooler and a supply of ice on hand. Fill plastic containers with water and store them frozen. Leave space for expansion. These can be used to keep food chilled and then as drinking water when they have thawed.
  • Store additional containers of water for long term use. One gallon per person per day is recommended.
  • Create a general emergency preparedness kit with a first-aid kit, personal hygiene items, flashlights, copies of important documents, emergency contact telephone numbers, etc. Include extra medicines.
  • Keep your car gas tank at least half full at all times.
  • Keep a key to your house with you if you regularly enter from your garage, because the electric door opener will not work.
  • Keep any generator activity well ventilated to avoid CO poisoning.

Billie Nicholson, editor
May 2015

 

References

Salt – Fact or Fiction

Salt

  • Salt is one of the most precious natural compounds known to man. The word salt comes from the Latin word for salary – when people were actually paid in salt.1
  • Table salt is composed of 97.5% sodium chloride. It is dried at more than 1,200º F. which separates out other naturally occurring minerals, making it a toxic compound to the human body.2
  • For the body to metabolize chemical table salt, it must waste tremendous amounts of energy to keep the body at optimum fluid balance – 20 grams of cellular water for each gram of table salt.2
  • Americans consume over 5 grams of sodium chloride per day. Much of this is found in pre-processed foods, used as a flavor enhancer. Doctors recommend diets much lower than this.2
  • Crystal salt like Pink Himalayan and Artisan salt contain 84 trace elements that are vital to health. They are alkaline minerals that help keep us hydrated, balance sodium-potassium rations and include electrolytes.3
  • Iodine was added to salt during production in America around 1924, at the request of government initiatives, due to iodine deficiency disorders. Lack of iodine had been related to thyroid disorders resulting in goiters (enlarged growths in the neck) and in mental deficiencies in new-borns.4
  • Recent research into iodine levels in 80 types of iodized salt brands showed that only 20% have enough of the micronutrient to be considered enough for daily level consumption.4
  • Benefits of consuming sea salt include building a strong immune system, enhancing digestion, reducing inflammation in the respiratory system, enhance heart health, prevent osteoporosis, and preserve hormones that help you deal with stress.5

The literature is filled with conflicting information. Is it good for you or not?

Billie Nicholson, Editor
March 2015

References

1.  http://www.saltinstitute.org/salt-101/
2. http://www.globalhealingcenter.com/natural-health/himalayan-crystal-salt-benefits/
3. http://saltrevolution.com/benefits-of-himalayan-salt/
4. http://www.globalhealingcenter.com/natural-health/iodine-in-salt/
5. http://readynutrition.com/resources/10-health-benefits-of-sea-salt_15092011/

 

March Newsletter Articles:

Add Sprouting Seeds to Your Supplies http://www.sunoven.com/archives/13252

How Bleach Kills Germs http://www.sunoven.com/archives/13270

Salt – Fact or Fiction     http://www.sunoven.com/archives/13279

Onions More Benefits Than You Know  http://www.sunoven.com/archives/13282

Veggie Balls for Pasta from the Solar Chef  http://www.sunoven.com/archives/13153

Every Day Uses for WD-40  http://www.sunoven.com/archives/13288

Sun Ovens Teach Solar Energy Concepts  http://www.sunoven.com/archives/13294

Starting Seeds and Caring for Seedlings   http://www.sunoven.com/archives/13297

Add Sprouting Seeds to Your Supplies

 

Sprouting seeds

Top left to right: Peas, Mung Beans; Bottom left to right: Lentils and Wheat Photo: RustyBuggy.com

Sprouts are one of the most concentrated natural sources for all life’s building blocks. They are packed with vitamins, minerals, proteins, enzymes, amino-acids, and trace elements. Seed sprouting is a capability everyone has, no matter where you live. It is a simple technique and with only the need for clean water, requires no energy to prepare.1 As a matter of fact, you can sprout seeds while you’re on the move, if necessary and will create no cooking odor to give away your position.

For survival preparation and self reliance, there are few better foods. Sprouting seeds can be stored for a long time – up to four years at stable 70º F, and even longer if stored in a colder environment. From time to time we test our supply for viability simply by sprouting some. Buy them in bulk and package them yourself in glass canning jars with rubber ringed lids. These will keep out vermin.2 Sprouted seeds increase in nutritional value exponentially over cooked dried seeds. Being natural nutrition, the components will fully penetrate the cell membranes and even help oxygenate cells.

 

Nutrition Packed and Ready to Go

In a survival situation and you’re hungry now, simply soaking seeds, nuts, grains or legumes in water for 30 minutes will activate some enzymes, increasing their nutritional value.3  Starch begins to disappear and is replaced by enzymes and an increased quality of protein, fat, certain amino acids, total sugar and B-group vitamins appear.4

Sprout different types of seeds to add more variety into your diet. In addition to good nutrition, many studies are showing that they have health benefits to protect us from diseases. Some sprouts have components that lower bad cholesterol and fat. Others offer protection against cancers. Alfalfa, broccoli and soybeans have been extensively studied.5

Preparedness Pro recommends 15 pounds of veggie seeds and 5-6 pounds protein seeds per adult for a year’s supply. For more information on how to start sprouting, see Sprouting 101.

References

1. http://survival5x5.com/?p=1954
2. http://www.naturalnews.com/031805_sprouts_emergency_food.html
3. http://www.preparednesspro.com/the-sprouting-solution
4.  http://www.2012-spiritual-growth-prophecies.com/survival-food.html
5. http://sproutpeople.org/sprouts/nutrition/science/#advantages

Billie Nicholson, Editor
March 2015

 

March Newsletter Articles:

Add Sprouting Seeds to Your Supplies http://www.sunoven.com/archives/13252

How Bleach Kills Germs http://www.sunoven.com/archives/13270

Salt – Fact or Fiction     http://www.sunoven.com/archives/13279

Onions More Benefits Than You Know  http://www.sunoven.com/archives/13282

Veggie Balls for Pasta from the Solar Chef  http://www.sunoven.com/archives/13153

Every Day Uses for WD-40  http://www.sunoven.com/archives/13288

Sun Ovens Teach Solar Energy Concepts  http://www.sunoven.com/archives/13294

Starting Seeds and Caring for Seedlings   http://www.sunoven.com/archives/13297

Preparing for a Pandemic

Community Emergency Response Team

What is a pandemic?

A pandemic is basically a global epidemic — an infectious disease that spreads rapidly to a large population in more than one continent.1 For example, influenza or ebola are highly contagious viruses. Two main features of any pandemic are:

  1. The virus is a new strain that has never infected people before, like the swine or avian flu in recent years, infecting a population which has no immunity to it.
  2. The infections spread on a global scale with a high mortality rate.2

Viruses can live on hard surfaces for up to eight (8) hours. Your exposure to sick people can increase the possibility of catching the disease. During the winter season, viral infection increases due to the low humidity in the air. This allows the germs to remain airborne longer.3 The Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends keeping a 6 foot buffer from sick people to cut down on the spread of disease.

Research shows anxiety and stress can weaken your immune system leaving you more vulnerable to infections.  Smoking cigarettes weakens the tiny disease-fighting hairs tucked inside the nasal passages and the lungs, which trap and dispose of germs. Drinking large quantities of alcohol in a short period of time weakens the immune system as well as dehydrating a person reducing the nose and throat’s ability to trap germs in mucus.4

Seasonal flu symptoms include:

  • Fever
  • Coughing and/or sore throat
  • Runny of stuffy nose
  • Headaches and/or body aches
  • Chills
  • Fatigue

Swine or Avian Flu Symptoms include:

  • All the seasonal symptoms PLUS
  • Vomiting
  • Diarrhea (exception – children)
  • Can be fatal

What to do when a pandemic is predicted?

Build a pandemic kit: to minimize germ/virus spread, care-givers should limit physical exposure to the contagious elements like body fluids.

  • Disposable hooded Tyvek suits with elastic wrists ankles and non-skid socks
  • Safety Goggles
  • N95-100 particulate respirator
  • Nitrile gloves
  • Liquid bandage spray protects against infection and helps wounds heal quicker
  • Anti microbial wipes to prevent the spread of germs and maintain  sanitary conditions
  • Tissue packs to contain mucus and sneezing and coughing spray
  • Trash bags for sanitary disposal of waste and used protective clothing
  • Antiseptic hand sanitizer gel can be used if access to good old soap and water isn’t available
  • Plastic sheeting is suggested to provide a separation between the sick and the not sick
  • Duct tape to use with the plastic sheeting

Acquire medication: to provide some comfort for fevers and congestion

  • Elderberry juice is a natural flu med, clinically proven to reduce the length of flu sickness – for a sick person: 1-3 Tbs every 4-6 hours; as an immune boost: 1-2 Tbs daily
  • Tylenol/ibuprofen for fever and aches and pain reduction 
  • Decongestants to provide comfort from coughs and colds; saline nasal spray

Food and supplies: to feed your family for the 90 days that it takes a pandemic to circle the globe, infect, kill, and then burn itself out from lack of susceptible hosts 

  • In addition to a variety of food for healthy people, include items that are easy to swallow and nutritious for the sick, like broths and jello.
  • Soap, disinfectants, rubbing alcohol, cleaning supplies
  • Extra bed linens, water proof mattress and pillow covers
  • Gasoline
  • Humidifiers

When to hunker down?

Pay attention to the news and other lines of communication in your community. When you learn that sickness is within 100 miles of your home, it is time to go into social isolation. Did you know that it takes less than 10% of key infrastructure workers calling in sick to disrupt delivery of utilities? That means no electricity. Are you prepared for that?

  • Isolation means no outside contact
  • Do not come within 20 feet of other people; be aware of any coughing or sneezing
  • Do not accept anything from anyone without 10 days of isolation; then sterilize
  • No grocery store for 90 days
  • No work – check on possibility of working from home
  • No school – get school work assignments for children to do at home
  • Don’t go to hospital except in case of immediate life threatening emergency
  • Be prepared for power grid to fail
  • Set up an isolation area for anyone who may become sick

What should be in an isolation room?

This should be in a separate building or outside in an RV, trailer, or tent. Remove all unnecessary items from the room. If someone exhibits symptoms, isolate them immediately. One person should be designated as the care giver. If there are two or more sick people, have them share a room and bathroom. Document the disease progress. If you have to keep the sick in the same dwelling, use the plastic sheeting and duct tape to create a barrier, floor t0 ceiling.

Isolation room contents: put these things in the isolation room and leave them there

  • Tissues
  • Trashcan with a lid and plastic liners
  • Plenty of water for the sick
  • Thermometer
  • Humidifier – extra moisture aids breathing
  • Face masks for the sick to protect care giver
  • Window fan for negative pressure and air circulation
  • Waste bucket

Wash all bedding and other clothing on the hottest setting. Wear gloves when handling contaminated items. Use disposable dishes and utensils. Use rubbing alcohol for sterilizing the sick room. Once infected with a flu virus a person is contagious  for up to 10 days. Protect yourself while caring for the sick by using protective clothing, masks and gloves. Wash your hands with soap and water frequently and increase your vitamins to boost immune system.

References
1.   http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Epidemic
2.  http://www.webmd.com/cold-and-flu/features/what-is-pandemic
3.  http://www.livescience.com/32284-how-do-we-catch-the-flu.html
4.  http://www.health.com/health/gallery/0,,20311978_2,00.html

Billie Nicholson, Editor
December 2014

This month’s issue includes:
  • During our conversations with Pearl Harbor Survivors, they continued to warn us of the importance of being prepared – on every level, from our national military down to each individual. During World War II, everyone sacrificed to insure that world peace would be restored.
  • Mama’s Last Gift ~ Who would expect 33 year old jelly to be any good? The jelly was firm and no crystallization or mold was apparent. A taste test confirmed the goodness within.
  • As you make your list and check it twice for holiday gifts, (even from-you-to-you gifts), check out our “Prepared Family Combo.”
  • Deer hunting season is a highlight of the winter months. Here is our favorite recipe made in the Sun Oven®. Served with warm Artisan bread, this makes a hearty meal in any weather.
  • Persimmons are a sweet and delicious fruit filled with vitamins and minerals. The Fuyu variety makes a nutritious persimmon leather.
  • Generosity during the holidays often includes contributions to food banks. Think about adding healthy items in your Food Bank Contribution.

Super-Size Your Rain Barrel for Water Storage


Super size water storageIt’s nice to have a supply of rainwater for gardening purposes and, with that in mind, we put a rain barrel to collect water from off the roof of our shop. The usual rain barrel system has a single plastic drum placed under the downspout on the corner of a building. About 30,000 gallons of rainwater falls on the roof of the average home per year. So there is plenty of water to go around. Excess water overflows the barrel and is absorbed into the ground.

We do not want to use valuable stored drinking water for cleaning, washing and hygiene if we lose access to our regular water supply. We decided to expand the amount of rainwater storage by adding two additional water barrels next to our existing one. We used sturdy plastic trashcans we had on hand.

When installing any water catchment system it is necessary to make sure that each barrel is on a sturdy base and is level. As a base we used cinder blocks and 2×4 pressure treated lumber.

Super size water storage

We drilled holes into the trash-can lids and installed garden hoses from one barrel to the next. To keep the hose ends from floating we placed a weight on the hose end. Before inserting the hose fully in place we charged each hose with water so that there would be a siphon-effect between the barrels.

When the water is used from one barrel the other barrels drain too. They also fill up the same way through the siphon-effect. As a final touch we placed a screen barrier at each hole so the mosquitos would not breed in the stored water. We treated the water by adding non-scented, not detergent bleach in the amount of 12 ounces per 50 gallon barrel. This prevents algae from growing in the water. We now have 150 gallons of rainwater storage capacity.

Super Size water storage

 

Robert Nicholson
November 2014

This month’s article includes:

Thanksgiving Day – An American Tradition  a change of economic systems led to this holiday for expressing gratitude  http://www.sunoven.com/archives/12222

A Winter “To Do” List  http://www.sunoven.com/archives/12232  Don’t let cold weather catch you unprepared.

Use household items to make your own Gel packs for sprains and swollen joints.  http://www.sunoven.com/archives/12238

Inviting pests to leave your home this winter, naturally. http://www.sunoven.com/archives/12260

Commit these ground to air emergency codes to memory. You may need them this winter. http://www.sunoven.com/archives/12243

Squash Chips – an alternate way to preserve summer squash without freezing.  http://www.sunoven.com/archives/12272

French style Stew   http://www.sunoven.com/archives/12032

 

Ground to Air Emergency Code

If you go hiking or skiing, these symbols may be useful should you need to communicate with a rescue team from afar. You need to send a message your rescuer will understand. Keep a copy of these symbols in your jacket pocket or better yet, commit these to memory.

Symbol              Message

I                        Serious injuries, need a doctorEmergency Ground to Air Emergency Code

II                        Need medical supplies

V                        Require assistance

F                         Need food and water

LL                       All is well

Y                         Yes

N                         No

X                         Require medical assistance

–>                       Proceeding in this direction

Go to a large clear area on the highest terrain. Use whatever you can find as a marker that can be seen from aircraft or search parties.  Pick items that will contrast with the ground. When all else fails, remember the international symbol : SOS

Billie Nicholson, Editor
November 2014

This month’s article includes:

Thanksgiving Day – An American Tradition  a change of economic systems led to this holiday for expressing gratitude  http://www.sunoven.com/archives/12222

A Winter “To Do” List  http://www.sunoven.com/archives/12232  Don’t let cold weather catch you unprepared.

Use household items to make your own Gel packs for sprains and swollen joints  http://www.sunoven.com/archives/12238

Super size your rain water storage  http://www.sunoven.com/archives/12265

Inviting pests to leave your home this winter, naturally http://www.sunoven.com/archives/12260

Squash Chips – an alternate way to preserve summer squash without freezing  http://www.sunoven.com/archives/12272

French style Stew   http://www.sunoven.com/archives/12032

A Winter “To Do” List

  1. Stock up on staples – buy items you like to eat including some things that require little or no cooking
  2. Winter clothing update
    1. Check for fit – for both adults and children
    2. Boots, hats, gloves, coats – depending on your location and your outdoor exposure
    3. Layers for added warmth – plan on thermal underwear, sweaters and jackets, ear covers
  3. Winterize your garden
    1. Clean up garden beds discarding dead plants
    2. Mulch items that overwinter
    3. Prepare protective coverings for cold hardy plants
    4. Final harvest – before a hard freeze ruins them
    5. Bring some plants inside – herbs are always welcome and add a flair to foods
    6. Put away plant cages – tomato cages need to be cleaned and stacked
    7. Store irrigation timers, removing batteries and put hoses inside after draining
  4. Plans to stay warm
    1. Sealing the windows and doors to minimize cold drafts
    2. Generator & fuel for power outages – run monthly to keep battery charged and seals lubricated
    3. Alternative energy sources – wood or biomass logs
  5. Prepare to shelter & feed livestock including pets
  6. Organize emergency tools together
    1. Flashlights and lanterns – extra batteries and oil
    2. Shovels and ice scrappers
    3. Water turn-off tool in case of burst pipe; cover outside spigots
  7. Winterize your vehicle
    1. Emergency supplies to eat, drink & keep warm for your emergency car kit
    2. Check battery health – clean up any battery cable corrosion
    3. Fill windshield washer reservoir with fluid containing antifreeze solution
    4. Check radiator antifreeze level
    5. Check tire pressure to reduce wear on tires
    6. Keep a bag of kitty litter in the car to help get out of slippery places

8. Pick an indoor hobby

Billie Nicholson, Editor
November 2014

 

This month’s article includes:

Thanksgiving Day – An American Tradition  a change of economic systems led to this holiday for expressing gratitude  http://www.sunoven.com/archives/12222

Use household items to make your own Gel packs for sprains and swollen joints  http://www.sunoven.com/archives/12238

Commit these ground to air emergency codes to memory. You may need them this winter. http://www.sunoven.com/archives/12243

Commit these ground to air emergency codes to memory. You may need them this winter. http://www.sunoven.com/archives/12243

Super size your rain water storage  http://www.sunoven.com/archives/12265

Squash Chips – an alternate way to preserve summer squash without freezing  http://www.sunoven.com/archives/12272

French style Stew   http://www.sunoven.com/archives/12032

Escaping a Riot

What to Do When

Escaping a Riot

http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/User:Mstyslav_Chernov/gallery

Riots can be as dangerous and as unpredictable as a natural disaster. They result in thousands of deaths and billions of dollars in property damage each year. Here are some steps to help protect yourself, should you get caught in the middle of a “community unrest” situation.

  1. Be aware – pay attention to events happening in your community or a city you might be visiting. Avoid riot-prone areas. Any crowd can become dangerous if the general mood becomes angry or hysteric. Know where you are in the community and be aware of escape routes; have several of them. Look for crossroads. This will give you an alternate route to take away from protestors or riot police. Always carry some cash in case you need to arrange another form of transportation or purchase food or drinks. You do not want to be considered a looter.
  2. Stay Calm – keep your emotions in check and don’t get caught up in the “mob mentality.” Avoid confrontations, keep your head down but be looking for an escape route, keep moving at a steady pace. Move to a place you can get inside away from the mayhem. Keep away from windows when inside, lock doors and windows, and look for a couple of exits in case you need them.
  3. Keep Companions Close - lock elbows, hold children in your arms, and keep up a reassuring dialog. Your focus should be getting away from the danger.
  4. Don’t Get Involved - your goal should be to keep as low a profile as possible and continue to move away from the center of action. If you are in the middle of a crowd, move toward the outside calmly and slowly.
  5. Drive Appropriately - stay in your car and remain calm, lock your doors, driving carefully but with intent. Should your vehicle become a target, get out and leave it behind. Otherwise, sound your horn and drive carefully around or through a group. Give them time to get out of the way. DO NOT drive toward a police line. They consider vehicles a deadly weapon and may react accordingly.
  6. Avoid Heavy Traffic areas - know alternate routes to get you over, around, or through a crowed area. Safety is the major issue here, not necessarily the quickest way home.
  7. Maintain Maneuverability - if a mob or the police rush your way, step sideways or move diagonally between groups rather than trying to out-run them.
  8. Communication - cell phone channels may be unavailable in the event of a major event. Resort to text messages. Look for phone booths; often they will have priority over other land lines when a system overloads.
  9. Carry a Flashlight - people often panic in the dark. Light a path and you can see where to go.
  10. Avoid Public Transportation – buses and taxis can become a target you don’t want to be trapped inside. Metro trains may be shut down and the stations can be full of people, waiting for another spark of hysteria to incite violence.
  11. Be Bold - act like you know what you’re doing and where you are going. Move and speak with confidence. Use an authoritarian, but not hostile, voice and people will listen. Most of all, think clearly about escape.

References:

http://www.wikihow.com/Survive-a-Riot
http://www.atmosphericsunlimited.com/blog/2013/05/how-to-survive-a-riot/
http://survivallife.com/2014/09/17/7-tips-for-surviving-a-mob-of-looters-2/?utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=9-17-14-content-mail
http://survivallife.com/?p=14931/?utm_source=newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=8-30-wrapup

Billie Nicholson, editor

October 2014

Additional articles in this month’s issue:

Prepper Camp™ Recap
What’s in Your Every Day Carry Kit?
How’s Your Battery
Emergency Medical Assessment
10 things You’ll Regret Not Having Enough of When the SHTF by Elise Xavier,
Waste Not … Want Not… Making Apple Cider Vinegar

Our Solar Chef presents Solar Apple Potato Soup 

 

 

Join The Every Needful Thing Newsletter

  • Helpful Preparedness Tips
  • Solar cooking Recipes
  • Preparedness product reviews and promotions

The monthly resource for emergency preparedness and food storage specialists, and their family, friends and neighbors.

argoz