Waste Not … Want Not … Making Apple Cider Vinegar

Return to Knowledge Basics

     Last fall we wrote about several ways to preserve apples. We canned apple slices, apple sauce and dried apple slices in the Sun Oven®. This year, we’ve had an abundant harvest of apples again. With all that apple preservation, we were left with piles of apple cores and peelings. Homemakers of times past had the perfect use for all this “waste” – making vinegar!
So this year, we decided to give it a try.
The process includes four steps and can take up to six weeks to complete.Apple Cider Vinegar

1. Make a clean cider from ripe apples.
2. Convert all the fruit sugar to alcohol through a process called alcohol fermentation.
3. Change all the alcohol to acetic acid referred to as acetic acid fermentation.
4. Clarify the acetic acid to prevent further fermentation and decomposition.1

Which Apples are Best?

     Fall and winter apple varieties are best for making vinegar because their sugar content is higher than summer apples. Gather fruit and wash it well. We soaked our apples in a diluted solution of vinegar in water. This is recommended to remove any surface pesticides and most of the surface bacteria. While the fruit is soaking in the vinegar solution, thoroughly wash and rinse some half-gallon jars (a good run through the dishwasher works well, too).
Peel and core the apples. Leave the scraps to air. They’ll turn brown. Fill the jar about 3/4 full of scraps and top with filtered (non-chlorinated) water. We covered the jars with coffee filters held in place with a rubber band and placed the jars into a container (to catch the foam-over from the fermentation process.) Cover and place in a warm, dark place (60-80ºF.) You can leave it for up to a month. You’ll notice the contents of the jar thickens and foams and a grayish scum forms on top. 2
We separated the peelings and cores from the liquid after a week, strained the liquid into clean jars, covered them, put them back in the warm space and left them to ferment. After about a month, you can taste test it for strength. When it pleases you, strain it again and bottle it. It may be cloudy and have a sediment. This is “the mother.” This slimy looking thing consists of acetic acid bacteria and cellulose. It’s a natural product of the vinegar-making process. Filtration through a coffee filter will remove most of it.                  There are lots of uses for apple cider vinegar,3 from drinking it, rinsing your hair with it and using it as a cleaning product – don’t forget making pickles! Let us know what uses you have for apple cider vinegar at editor@sunoven.com. 

Making Apple Cider Making Apple Cider OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

References

  1. http://www.earthclinic.com/remedies/how_to_make_apple_cider_vinegar.html
  2. http://thehealthyeatingsite.com/apple-cider-vinegar-recipe/
  3. http://www.rd.com/home/150-household-uses-for-vinegar/2/

Billie Nicholson, Editor

October 2014

Additional articles in this month’s issue:

Prepper Camp™ Recap
What’s in Your Every Day Carry Kit?
How’s Your Battery
Emergency Medical Assessment
10 things You’ll Regret Not Having Enough of When the SHTF by Elise Xavier,
Escaping a Riot

Our Solar Chef presents Solar Apple Potato Soup 

Chilling Food Without Electricity

Reproduced from Practical Action

Practical Action is an international non-governmental organization (NGO) that uses technology to challenge poverty in developing countries. Registered in the United Kingdom, they find out what people are doing and help them to do it better. Through technology they enable poor communities to build on their skills and knowledge to produce sustainable and practical solutions – transforming their lives forever and protecting the world around them. Practical Action works directly in more than 45 developing countries across the world. They have an extensive library of simple techniques to solve survival problems.  

Zeer PotThe Zeer Pot Fridge -How a clay pot refrigerator can help beat hunger

In hot climates, food doesn’t stay fresh for long. Tomatoes go off in just two days. After four days carrots and okra are rotten. With no means of preserving their crops, poverty stricken families have been battling hunger and even famine.

One ingenious solution is the zeer pot. Using this simple technology, the same vegetable can last for up to 20 days. This all natural refrigerator offers families, who already succeed in food production, their right to food preservation and really can help to improve their everyday lives; for now and for the future.

Zeer Pot – Simple technology that brings fresh hope

The zeer pot is a simple fridge made of local materials. It consists of one earthenware pot set inside another, with a layer of wet sand in between (about 2 inches). As the moisture evaporates it cools the inner pot, keeping up to 12kg (~26 lbs.) of fruit and vegetables fresher for longer. Wet down twice daily. The pots should be covered with a ceramic lid or wet cloth. They should be kept in a well ventilated area but out of direct sunlight. The pots work best when placed on a metal frame for better air circulation. The average temperature drops 23.5 º F. below the outside temperature. Drier climates work best. They are often called the “desert refrigerator.”

Use a Zeer Pot to store fruits and vegetables

Deterioration of fruits and vegetables during storage depends largely on temperature. One way to slow down this change and so increase the length of time fruits and vegetables can be stored, is by lowering the temperature to an appropriate level. It must be remembered that if the temperature is too low the produce will be damaged and also that as soon as the produce leaves the cold store, deterioration starts again and often at a faster rate.

The ceramic refrigerator has proved very successful and it has been tested with a number of different vegetables. For example tests have shown that these foods can be kept fresh for the following amount of time:

Tomatoes – 3 weeks          Okra – 2 weeks          Rocket – 5 days        Carrots – 20 days        Meat – 14 days

In a short or long term interruption of electricity in the US, this could make a difference in preventing food spoilage as well as providing some variety in one’s diet. They are currently being used successfully in Sudan, Gambia and Nigeria, Africa. Consider adding this technique to your knowledge base.

Zeer pot

Reproduced with Permission

Additional References:

The Zeer pot emergency refrigerator – http://4dtraveler.net/2012/05/11/the-zeer-pot-emergency-refrigerator/

Gambian farmers benefit from Sudanese fridge -

http://www.new-ag.info/en/news/newsitem.php?a=1717

 June 2014

 

 

 

What Vegetables Grow in the Shade?

Some of our friends have complained that their yards were so shady that they doubted they could grow anything in a garden. In answer to their questions, here are some plants that can be grown in shade. Don’t give up on your yard either. Vegetables grown for their leaves, stems or buds can tolerate shade better than those grown for their fruit or roots, although some of these can tolerate light shade. Their size or yield may be affected, but they will still taste good.

Leaf LettuceLeaf Lettuce - is one of the first plants up in our garden each year. It thrives in soil of most any type, but does best in moisture retentive soil with some compost available. Our garden beds get partial shade from a neighbor’s oak trees. This has been a benefit as the summer temperatures rise. Lettuce often wants to bolt, or go to bloom, as the temperatures rise. One gardener suggested planting lettuce north of a row of sunflowers that can provide partial shade making the lettuce bear longer. You don’t have to wait until the plants get really large to begin harvesting. Cut the leaves individually with scissors. The plants will continue to produce new leaves. Leaves will get bitter as the plants begin to bloom.

 

Green OnionsGreen Onions - are cold hardy and can tolerate partial shade. We plant green onions starting in the fall in Pensacola and add a few more bulbs each month to assure we have green onions into summer. Good companions for onions are potatoes and lettuce. Cut the green tops for sauteing or garnishing. As they grow larger, the white bulbs can be harvested, too. Onions like a little organic fertilizer or compost. Harvest before the rainy season, they don’t like wet feet and will rot. Use them in potato dishes, with peas, and green beans or steam them in a foil packet on the grill. AllRecipes.com has a green onion pancake recipe.

swiss chardSwiss Chard - likes sun or partial shade and is hardy to about 20ºF. We planted some in January, right before the temperature dropped to 18ºF. We covered them with shade cloth. They suffered some brown edged leaves, but are recovering now. A member of the beet family, they can have green, yellow or red purple stems. Chard can be eaten raw when young in a green salad, added to smoothies, or sauteed in olive oil with garlic and crushed red pepper. This green is best when served immediately after picking. It is loaded with nutrients, second only to spinach. In addition to anti-oxidants, it can also help stabilize blood sugar levels and benefit the pancreas.

sugar snap peasSugar Snap Peas – are one of our most favorite veggies. When the pods start developing, we start hovering with anticipation. The edible pods go a lot farther than the pea seeds. We eat them in green salads, if we can get them to the table, and as part of a sauteed vegetable mix. Sugar snap peas need to be trellised and last longer if grown in light shade. Keep the soil moist. We sprinkle with liquid fertilizer, once they start blooming. Peas contain vitamin C, K, niacin and anti-oxidants. They have the best food value when eaten immediately after harvesting.

Billie Nicholson, Editor 2014

 

Additional Articles in the April 2014 Issue:

  • A reminder to review and rotate three types of items in your 72 hour emergency kit.
  • A discussion of the importance of “duck and cover” in surviving a nuclear attack
  • What are your plans to provide protein in your diet in an emergency situation? Here are some items to add to your supplies
  • Are members of your family hearing impaired that might not hear a smoke alarm?
  • Our featured contributor this month is Tess Pennington of ReadyNutrition.com. She shares an article about Bio Mass Briquettes. Now you’ll have an environmentally friendly use for those shredded documents.
  • Sun Ovens are a perfect partner for bio mass briquettes, here’s how …
  • Speaking of gardening, do you use Epsom salts? Here’s why.
  • We can all be prepared to take the initiative to save a life, should we be faced with a life or death situation. Here are three critical first aid procedures that can be accomplished with one dressing.
  • Our Solar Chef has included a wonderful recipe for Solar Stuffed Shells. Give it a try, these are yummy.

Billie Nicholson, Editor
April 2014

Alternative Protein Sources

What are your plans to provide alternative protein sources in an emergency situation?

As you collect canned goods don’t forget about this vital nutrient. The human body is nearly half protein, found in muscles, blood, antibodies and enzymes which make other body functions work. Often commercially processed meats are loaded with salt to enhance the flavor.  There are other sources. Here are some items to consider adding to your supplies.

  1. Nuts and Seeds – are high in protein and healthy fats. If you buy them prepackaged, they are ready to eat. They only last six months to a year, depending on the type of nut. Their high oil content reduces shelf life. Peanut butter is high in protein and available dried.
  2. Beans - are one of the longest cultivated plants, easy to digest and high in fiber. They also help maintain stable blood sugar levels by slowing the rate of carbohydrate absorption.1 Dried beans are economical and store well for an extended period of time. Store them in jars or mylar bags with oxygen absorbers. They will require water for presoaking before cooking, so plan ahead when preparing them. Cook with anise or coriander seeds to reduce flatulence as they’re digested by microbes in your intestine. There are lots of varieties for your culinary pleasure. Canned beans can be eaten right after opening, even cold in a power down situation.
  3. Chia Seeds - have double the amount of protein found in other seeds. Humans began eating chia seeds around 3500 BC. Aztecs and Mayans considered them magical because they increased stamina and energy over long periods. Chia seeds are high in fiber, omega fatty acids, calcium, and antioxidants as well. Because they absorb 12 times their weight, their expansion in your stomach will curb your appetite.
  4. Protein Powders – are available in three common forms, whey, soy and casein. Whey is the most popular because it is a water-soluble milk protein. It contains all nine amino acids necessary to build proteins in the human body. Soy has been favored by vegans, but recently it has been associated with altering estrogen balance. Casein powder is used with cheese production.
  5. Textured Vegetable Protein (TVP) - is produced from soy flour after the oil has been extracted. It is cooked under pressure, extruded and dried. Soy flour has a long shelf life if kept in a cool, dry place. With varying flavors added, it can taste like sausage, beef, ham, bacon or chicken. Easily rehydrated, it is economical and an excellent meat substitute or meal extender. One ounce of TVP is the equivalent of three ounces of meat.
  6. Freeze-dried Meat - has the water removed through sublimation, which turns water molecules into vapor. Freeze-drying food affects meat’s texture more than other preservation techniques. They are extremely light and easy to carry but more expensive to purchase. While some fruits taste great freeze-dried, meat will need to be rehydrated.
  7. Powdered Eggs and Milk – made by spray drying, the process removes nearly all of the water prohibiting the growth of microorganisms. Non-fat dried milk is best for long term storage.  Eggs are available as whole, yolks and whites. Store cool and dry. Refrigerate when opened.

Billie Nicholson, Editor 2014

References

1 http://readynutrition.com/resources/the-top-5-protein-sources-for-your-shtf-diet_27032013/

2 http://www.doctoroz.com/blog/lindsey-duncan-nd-cn/chia-ancient-super-secret

3 https://www.usaemergencysupply.com/information_center/all_about_textured_vegetable_protein.htm

Additional Articles in the April 2014 Issue:

  • A reminder to review and rotate three types of items in your 72 hour emergency kit.
  • A discussion of the importance of “duck and cover” in surviving a nuclear attack
  • Are members of your family hearing impaired that might not hear a smoke alarm?
  • Our featured contributor this month is Tess Pennington of ReadyNutrition.com. She shares an article about Bio Mass Briquettes. Now you’ll have an environmentally friendly use for those shredded documents.
  • Sun Ovens are a perfect partner for bio mass briquettes, here’s how …
  • Some of our friends have complained that their yards were so shady that they doubted they could grow anything in a garden. In answer to their questions, here are some plants that can be grown in shade. Don’t give up on your yard either. Read more …
  • Speaking of gardening, do you use Epsom salts? Here’s why.
  • We can all be prepared to take the initiative to save a life, should we be faced with a life or death situation. Here are three critical first aid procedures that can be accomplished with one dressing.
  • Our Solar Chef has included a wonderful recipe for Solar Stuffed Shells. Give it a try, these are yummy.

 Billie Nicholson, Editor
April 2014

72 Hour Kit Rotation Required

72 hour kitTime to Check Your 72 Hour Kit

In the September 2013 “Every Needful Thing” newsletter, we included a list of items to pack in an emergency escape bag, AKA your 72-hour kit. Hope you made one!  We included some things that can last a long time and others that have a shorter storage time. This month is a good time to pull out the bag and review it’s contents.

  1. Exchange the food - Did you pack some granola bars and cracker packets? How about some nuts or peanut butter items? Many of these items contain oil of one kind or another that oxidizes or goes “rancid” if kept for over six months. Take out your snacks and eat them – or at least taste them to determine if they are still fit to eat. As you eat them, add these items to a list as a reminder to replace them on your next shopping trip.  It’s a real disappointment to open one of these packs and find them yucky. Can you imagine how bad you would feel if you were in an emergency situation and that is all you had to eat? Do you have an 72-hour kit for your children? Are they still eating those “chicken sticks”? Have their favorite snacks changed? Staying up to date on their  favorites will make a disruptive situation a little more comfortable.
  2. Check clothing sizes - This is a good idea for adults as well as children. Kids are always growing and changing sizes, so make adjustments by including some currently fitting and well used clothes for them.  Since disasters can happen any time of the year, a bag of extra jackets for snow or lighter weight clothes for warmer weather is a good idea. Adults, include some extra socks, “sweats” or jeans and long sleeve shirts that can be rolled up if necessary,. Rain ponchos are a must, how does yours look?
  3. Rotate Batteries & Medicines - Do you have battery operated items like two way radios or flash lights in your kit? Batteries leak when stored for a long time and can ruin the item they’re in.  Remember to store batteries separately. Prescriptions have expirations. Rotate these, too.

Keep Your 72 Hour Kit Updated

References:

http://www.ready.gov/kit

Additional Articles in the April 2014 Issue:

  • A discussion of the importance of “duck and cover” in surviving a nuclear attack
  • What are your plans to provide protein in your diet in an emergency situation? Here are some items to add to your supplies …
  • Are members of your family hearing impaired that might not hear a smoke alarm?
  • Our featured contributor this month is Tess Pennington of ReadyNutrition.com. She shares an article about Bio Mass Briquettes. Now you’ll have an environmentally friendly use for those shredded documents.
  • Sun Ovens are a perfect partner for bio mass briquettes, here’s how …
  • Some of our friends have complained that their yards were so shady that they doubted they could grow anything in a garden. In answer to their questions, here are some plants that can be grown in shade. Don’t give up on your yard either. Read more …
  • Speaking of gardening, do you use Epsom salts? Here’s why.
  • We can all be prepared to take the initiative to save a life, should we be faced with a life or death situation. Here are three critical first aid procedures that can be accomplished with one dressing.
  • Our Solar Chef has included a wonderful recipe for Solar Stuffed Shells. Give it a try, these are yummy.

 

Billie Nicholson, Editor
April 2014

Tuna Casserole from Food Storage

Tuna CasseroleTuna Casserole

All the ingredients in this recipe came from food storage. We rotated out the oldest items from our shelves. On a 70 degree day, the sun came out in the afternoon. We started this at 3:30PM and cooked it until 5:30PM. Temperature held at 300 degrees. The casserole was nice and bubbly hot throughout and the flavors were well blended.

Ingredients

3 – 5 oz White tuna canned in water, drained
1 – 12 oz. can cream of mushroom soup
2 – 15 oz cans of baby peas, drained
16 oz. macaroni or wide egg noodles, pre-boiled
2 TBS capers
1 – 4 oz. jar pimentos
15 oz. mayonaise
White pepper to taste

Directions

Preheat the Sun Oven® while mixing the ingredients. Mix the ingredients lightly in a bowl. Place in a greased casserole dish and top with Italian bread crumbs. Bake in the Sun Oven for two hours ’til hot and bubbly. These ingredients will make two 9×12″ casseroles. Cook one today and save the other in your refrigerator for a couple of days. It will be welcome a second time.

Off the Grid Food Preservation Techniques

Lisa Lynn, from The Self Sufficient Home Acre presented alternative ways to preserve food during the 2014 Survival Summit. Food preservation is important because fresh food has a short shelf life. Extending the life of food allows for less waste. We all need to expand our preservation skills as part of our survival plans. We have no guarantee that we will have food in the future just because we have some today. Whether we acquire food from a grocery store or by foraging, hunting, fishing or gardening, these tips are useful.

Some preservation techniques require purchasing additional equipment, like pressure or waterbath canners, vacuum sealers and their supplies. In the long run, you can save money and more importantly, you know the quality and the source of the food you preserve. There are several techniques that can be used without electricity.

Root cellars and clamping involve storing fruits and vegetables in cool storage. Root cellars need to be below ground far enough to be below the freeze zone. They need to have good ventilation and a way to control the humidity and temperature as different crops have varied optimum storage requirements. Clamping involves digging a trench, adding straw layers below and above the stored food, covering the straw with soil and a tarp. Stored items need to be checked frequently, using or discarding the oldest or any that are past their prime. Remember one rotten apple can spoil the rest.

Dehydrating fruits and vegetables allows for longer storage time, the food is often much lighter and more portable.  Herbs can be dried by simply hanging them in a dry place out of direct sunlight.

The Sun Oven® can be used for dehydrating fruit, vegetables or meat. You need to watch the temperature so the food doesn’t get cooked. Alternatively, you can build a fire, cover it with a lattice of branches, then smoke and dehydrate at the same time.

If you smoke meat, the temperature should be 145º F. Adding green wood, small twigs & branches to a low fire will create lots of smoke. The length of drying time will depend on the thickness of the meat slices. Adding salt to thin strips will speed up the process. Salt is a natural preservative. It draws moisture out and kills bacteria. To extend the shelf life, add ground celery seed as natural nitrates to kill bacteria. The drier the meat, the longer you can keep it. Moist cured meat should be used within six months. Store it in temperatures from 36-40º F. Place it in an air-tight, non-reactive container – don’t use cast iron or aluminum pans. Fish can also be smoked and dried or salted and air dried.

Fermenting and culturing food with bacteria and yeast causes a chemical change in the food that allows it to be kept for a longer time. Examples of fermented and cultured food include sauerkraut, cheese, yogurt, kimchee and pickles. The probiotics present in this process increase the nutrition and digestibility of foods.This process creates some marvelous, complex flavors. Plan to use jars or crocks and colored sea salt (not processed). The standard fermenting recipe is 6 TBS salt to 1/2 gallon water. Lactobacilli thrive in a fermenting environment and repel other decomposing bacteria. Make a liquid to submerge the vegetables. Cover and watch for bubbles, that’s a sign the process is working. You will need to add an airlock valve or burp the lid from time to time to let the gas out. Store in a cool place. Fermented foods will keep for several months, but most foods are not suited for very long storage.

Editor’s Note: After Hurricane Ivan, a friend of ours dug a pit in the ground, lined it with plastic bags, straw and rock salt. Into it she placed the frozen contents of her freezer, covered it with plastic bags, followed by more rock salt and straw and topped with styrofoam. Things stayed frozen for nearly two weeks in the hot Florida weather. 

Honey, More than Just a Sweetener

honeyHoney is a viscous sweetener

made naturally by bees, from the nectar of plants, for their own consumption. After collection, the bees regurgitate the nectar into hexagonal-sided honeycomb cells made of wax and stored inside a bee hive. The constant fanning by the bees’ wings cause evaporation creating the sweet liquid we call honey. The color and flavor of honey will vary based on the flower nectar collected. Beekeepers harvest honey by collecting the honeycomb frames and scraping off the wax cap made by the bees to seal the honey in each cell.  Spinning the frames in a centrifuge extracts the liquid from each cell.

It is a versatile food staple and with a little care, can be stored indefinitely. Honey found in Egyptian tombs was still good after 2,000 years. Consider adding it to your emergency supplies.

Raw honey,

processed with a minimal amount of heat, contains many phytonutrients which provide anti-bacterial, anti-viral and anti-fungal properties. There are three key health benefits: it is a natural energy booster,  a great immune system builder, and  a natural remedy for many ailments

When you use it in cooking instead of sugar, reduce the amount by 1/2, reduce liquid by 1/4 cup and reduce cooking temperature 25º.

As a remedy for ailments, it can be used for hangovers, sore throats, sleeplessness, and cuts and burns. Mix it with vinegar for a self-detox, with cinnamon for bad breath and hair loss, and with milk to improve digestion. Do not feed it to babies less than a year old because of the danger of botulism.

Recent declines in honey bee populations

have researchers looking for causes. Their results show a complex mix of pesticide and fungicide exposure and bee pathogens as the problem.  Some regulatory agencies are considering stricter controls on agricultural chemicals used as part of the solution.

Billie Nicholson

5 Food Storages Lies to Watch Out For

Thanks to Jeff at LPC Survival for contributing this article. 

LPC_5_Food_Storage_Lies-300x300I have noticed a trend over the last few years when it comes to food storage,  A lot of companies are claiming anything in order to get your business. I wanted to expose these things as food storage lies, whether intentional or not. At the very least, they are misleading claims, but having received many calls and emails from food storage companies, I had to share this list of what I see as food storage lies or misleading statements when it comes to purchasing long term food storage.

Lie #1: “Our dehydrated pouched Food Storage meals last 25 years.”

The most prolific of all the lies, this one doesn’t reveal the fact that the food must be stored at 55 degrees or less at all times. The chances of you storing it at 55 degrees is extremely rare.  They don’t even put this on their web sites, and won’t even tell you on the phone.  Once you get the bucket, you will see the fine print.  Some may not even have this fact on the bucket when you get it.  Also, one Food Storage company who claims a 25 year shelf life has even admitted to me that they use the claim just to be “competitive.” Integrity should be the first thing a company stands by. I have seen reputable companies offer Freeze dried food in pouches and only claim 10-12 year shelf life. That is what I look for.
Lie #2: “Our Food Storage is Non-GMO.”
If any company says that, I would specifically ask them for what certifications they have.  Then have them email you the certifications. Don’t let them say I will get back to you, demand to see them before placing your order. If they have a USDA Organic Certification or another reputable GMO testing certification, then they have something to back up the claim. Buyer Beware on this Claim, be sure to see the evidence.
Lie #3: “Our Food Storage is Gluten Free.”
    This is mostly done over the phone, but I have seen it on some of their web sites. This claim goes a long with the Non-GMO claim, ask for certifications and make sure they are from organizations that you find reputable. Ask for certifications before thinking about purchasing any of their food storage. I also recommend calling the certification companies, and talking with them about the process.  Your health could be at stake, I recommend being extremely cautious of any food storage company that claims Gluten Free.  Making Gluten Free food can be pricy, so if the prices are low or comparable to their regular meals,  I would look elsewhere.
Lie #4: “Our Pouches are nitrogen flushed and have an oxygen absorber in them, which helps them last 25 years.”
While the first part of this claim is true, the 2nd part is not. They can also say they double or triple nitrogen flush the pouches, its all marketing.  Also, check Lie #1 for their claim of 25 years.

(If you are unfamiliar with nitrogen flushing, here is a basic description of what it is:
Nitrogen flushing is a type of preservation method used with packaged foods such as coffee beans, nuts, rice cakes, snack crackers and chips. When you go to the grocery store to buy a bag of chips, you’ll probably notice the bag is puffed and filled with ‘air.’ But it’s not exactly like the air we breathe because the package doesn’t contain oxygen.
When processed food is exposed to oxygen, it deteriorates – oils go rancid, discoloration occurs and the food spoils. Oxygen can be removed from the packaging by removing all of the air with a vacuum, which will increase the shelf life of the food packed inside.)

Lie #5: “We have Celebrity and Radio personalities that endorse our products”
These are paid endorsements and some of them are very costly endorsements. I wonder if these people have even tried the meals which they endorse, as they seem to mimic each other when the ads run.  Don’t fall for the marketing, if there is a high profile endorsement, I personally won’t buy it.
Lastly, there are reputable food storage companies and organizations to buy food storage from. The ones I personally purchase are either 100% freeze dried, USDA Organic, or minimally processed. I avoid dehydrated Meals because I have seen that they are highly processed.

Be sure to check the list above before falling for what I call: “Food Storage Lies”.       -Jeff

LPC Survival have helped thousands of people get better prepared. Visit them at LPC Survival      Reproduced with Permission

A Sun Oven® in Your Preparedness Plan

Sun OvenDon’t get caught in an emergency situation without a Sun Oven®

Many people consider a Sun Oven® an essential tool in their family emergency plans. A Sun Oven® will enable your family to be better prepared in the following ways:

  1. Water Purification – Pasteurize or boil drinking water.
  2. Food - Boil, bake or steam food. This is the most fuel efficient way to rehydrate freeze-dried and dehydrated foods.
  3. Food Storage - Create your own food storage by dehydrating fruits, vegetables, and meats.
  4. Fuel Storage - Decrease your need for fuel. It is difficult and dangerous to store a large amount of fuel for an extended period of time. Using the sun on sunny days and the Sun Oven® as a wonder box (or retained heat cooker) on cloudy days reduces the amount of fuel you need to store.
  5. First Aid - Heat water for cleaning wounds and personal hygiene & sterilize medical instruments.

 The Sun Oven® in Action

Sun Oven - eggs

Sun Oven - bread

Sun Oven - drying veggies

September 2013, Every Needful Thing                             Billie A. Nicholson

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