Add a Survival Net to Your Bug-Out Bag

Joe Nobody discussed the uses of the survival net during the Survival Summit. You can use it to build 10 life-saving items in a pinch. The survival net is lightweight, has a 1” grid weave, and is available at military surplus stores. The standard issue net is 6-8 feet wide by 12 feet long. It comes complete with “S” hooks, MOLLE pouch and paracord. It should cost less than $30. The “S” hooks should be rated at 200 pounds.

Survival Net Uses Include:

  • Hammock – sling it between two trees; take some small twigs and cut some grooves in them and weave them into each end of the hammock to create a sleeping platform and keep it from bunching up on the ends. Practice doing this. Don’t under-estimate the time it will take to get this set up. String up a poncho or plastic bag above to keep moisture off. A hammock will provide better thermal comfort than sleeping on the cold or wet ground. It is much quicker to break camp with a hammock than a tent. It is lighter and takes up less space in your pack.
  • Ghillie suit or camouflage cloak – weave plant branches and leaves into the opens. It breathes better than commercial ones. Make it mid-calf length to allow for more mobility and minimize snagging. Camouflage is not always wooded; use this in different environments. Take whatever is common and secure it to the net. It is always best to avoid confrontation. Use this to get through an area without being detected.
  • Litter – it can be used as a stretcher to carry someone. Use thumb sized limbs for support. Weave the limbs along both edges and at the end. It is easier to drag an injured companion. The greener the wood the more flexible it is.
  • Fishing net -
    • Create a two man drag; one on either side of the creek. Add some rocks on one edge to serve as resistance so it sinks to the bottom.
    • Add rocks on the corners and secure with hooks. Fling it like a Frisbee on top of the fish. rocks will sink and trap the fish in the middle of the net. Weave paracord around the edge to be able to retrieve it with ease. You do need to throw where the fish are. Find them next to structures they might use for hiding places.
    • Make a fish pen by using stakes to create a fence with the net. Attach paracord or other rope to close it.
    • Hiding place – local foliage can be woven into or stacked against the net. Hang one side and let one side fall to the ground and fill in with greens and twigs.
    • Blanket, jacket or raincoat – strips of bark or shaved wood can be woven in for insulation. Plastic bags can be secured to the mesh to form a raincoat or poncho. Old newspapers can be woven in for insulation as well as pine needles, leaves, foliage and even vines. Rags and scraps of clothing can be woven into the net to create a barrier. Heat small rocks or stones in a campfire and secure them in the net for a large scale warmer.
    • Climbing tool – roll up net to use for short ascents. Twist it into a rope. The girth of the twisted net provides sufficient hand hold. Gear ties can be woven into the net for hand/footholds. This works for descending also. Heavy gear can be raised or lowered in a bundle.
    • Cargo Bag - the net can handle more weight than you can carry.
    • Snare - use it to catch small game with some bait and wire.
    • Door Security - securing the net with small hooks around a door frame can make any threshold extremely difficult to breech. This also works for windows. It is hard to cut through. Add something that jingles as a warning.

Reproduced with Permission

Additional Articles in this month’s issue:

Billie Nicholson, Editor
May 2014

Creating a Sustainable Garden

By Billie Nicholson as Presented by Cindy Conner

SoilWhat is Soil?

Wearing her hand-made vest of many colors, Cindy Conner of Ashland, VA, talked about the things gardeners need to consider to make a garden that will sustain itself. Soil is much more than dirt. It consists of inorganic materials from rocks; organic material from dead and decayed plant life; biological systems – consisting of bacteria, fungi, algae, protozoa and other microscopic animals like round worms and earthworms; and air and water occupying the spaces between the soil components. Soil is a world of its own, whose components work together to support plants not just for anchorage, but also to provide nutrients enabling plants to grow, conduct photosynthesis and create food for us to eat and oxygen for us to breathe. In order for plants to continue to grow successfully, the soil they grow in needs to be continually nourished as well.

“Part of the cycle of life many try to ignore is microorganisms.  Without them, we would cease to exist.  Microbes are necessary for our food to be transformed into nutrients that our body can use.  If things are not working well in your gut, your body becomes unbalanced, causing havoc throughout. … In my studies of nutrition and of the soil, I’ve come to realize that the same thing going on in our gut with the microbes, is going on in the soil.  When the right balance of microorganisms is present, plants thrive.  Healthy soil produces healthy plants, which feed healthy people.  We are what we eat.  We are a people of the earth.  When we get our nutrients from REAL food, they come with the enzymes and co-nutrients, in proper proportion, necessary for assimilation in our bodies.” HomePlaceEarth

Soil Needs Food, too

To keep our gardens healthy and productive, we need to feed the soil. This does not mean, just add chemical fertilizers. We need to replenish the compost – organic materials in the soil. Making your own compost pile consisting of raw food scraps, non-edible plant parts, like older outside leaves on cabbage, tea and coffee grounds, egg shells and animal manure will replenish nourishing material. Another way to help this is to grow cover crops in part of your garden beds as a crop rotation. Cover crops are grown specifically to feed the soil. Some of these may also provide food for people as well, if you allow the plants to grow to maturity making fruit or seeds. Not all areas in the world produce gardens year-round. In these areas cover crops are grown during the winter. According to  GROW BIOINTENSIVE® researchers, 60% of your garden space should be in cover crops/compost all the time.

How does this work? The cover plants will be grown, cutdown and left or turned under the soil to decompose in place as the roots and green matter breakdown returning the nutrients to be used again by other plants. You can even use the old plants you have grown in other parts of your garden. When plants like lettuce go to flower, they are no longer edible. Just pull those plants and toss them into the composting bed. Why have a separate place requiring extra time and energy to move? Just make it in an existing garden bed. This was an “AHA” moment for me.

What can you plant and when?  Cindy has a handout with suggested plants for fall, spring  and summer cover plantings. These cover crops do not require the bed to be fallow for an entire year. Some crops like buckwheat work when you need something to fill a bed for about a month between main crops. Some plants, like cereal rye can be cut and then transplanted into about two weeks later. The plant material can be moved or left as mulch to keep down weeds and hold moisture.

     An important note: If you use herbicides on your lawn, do not add these clippings to your composting beds. The herbicides of today do not decompose during the composting process. These herbicides, designed to kill broad leaf plants producing weed free lawns, can damage your garden plants. Even manure from an animal fed on herbicide treated hay will still contain active herbicides.

Additional Articles in this month’s issue:

Billie Nicholson, Editor
May 2014

Be Water Smart

Be Water Smart12 Ways to Conserve Water

According to the recently released data from NOAA, nationwide, January was below average in precipitation. The state of California continues to suffer from water shortages, especially in the  San Joaquin Valley, the salad bowl of the world.  In addition to losses of jobs, the effects of this drought will show up in every grocery store across the country in the form of reduced selection and higher prices. Besides growing some of our own vegetables, we should all consider the following tips to help conserve water.

  1. Make sure your home is LEAK FREE. To check this, read your water meter at a time when no water is being used. Two hours is a good test time. Check the meter again after two hours. There should be no change. If there is, you have a leak.
  2. The first place to check for leaks are dripping faucets. Stop these by replacing washers in the hot and cold handles. A one second dripping rate will waste 2,700 gallons of water per year. This will increase your water and sewer costs or strain your septic system.
  3. The second place to check is the toilet. Add a few drops of food coloring to the water holding tank. If there is a leak, the died water will show up in the toilet bowl in about 30 minutes. Replacements parts can be purchased at your local hardware store and are easy enough to change. (I know, I’ve done it.) If the toilet handle sticks leaving the flapper open, lots of water will be wasted. Replacement or repairs of the flapper/chain mechanism is also easy. Be aware of the sound of running water. Check the toilet first when you hear it. Installing a low water volume tank or adding a brick inside an older tank will raise the water level in the tank but reduce the amount used per flush. Throw tissues and dead bugs in the trash to avoid unnecessary flushes.
  4. Install a circulating water pump on your hot water heater. These come with timers and can be adjusted to allow warm water to be circulating in your water lines. You’ll get warm water quicker.
  5. Running water while you brush your teeth can waste five gallons of water. Wet your brush. Then apply toothpaste and brush without water. Rinse your mouth with water from a cup. Wash out brush and sink with water from the tap.
  6. In the kitchen, if you’re washing dishes by hand, fill a small tub or large bowl with soapy water and wash in this. Stack the washed dishes and then rinse them. Garbage disposals require lots of water to operate properly. Start a compost pot as an alternative method of disposing of uncooked food waste. The worms in your garden will thank you.
  7. Store drinking water in the refrigerator. You will not need to run the tap to get cool water.
  8. If you have a well, check the pump periodically. Listen for the pump to click on and off while water is not being used. If it does, you have a leak.
  9. Mulch around plants to hold moisture in the soil.
  10. Water lawns and garden in the early morning hours. Don’t allow sprinklers to leak, or water your street and driveway. Change their position so water falls on lawn and bushes. Check sprinkler heads periodically for line breaks and head damage. You’ll recognize the water oozing in the grass near the head. Adjust the timers to control watering duration based on the time of year.
  11. Raise your mower blade to three and one-half or four inches. A higher cut encourages grass roots to grow deeper, shades the roots and holds soil moisture better than a shorter cut.
  12. Be aware of and follow all water conservation and water shortage rules in effect in your community. Every drop counts.                                                                                     Water Saving Tips

Additional Articles in this month’s issue:

Billie Nicholson, Editor
May 2014

Will the Paramedics Make It?

Israeli dressing Paramedic Multi-Purpose Wound Dressing

We can all be prepared to take the initiative to save a life, should we be faced with a life or death situation. Here are three critical first aid procedures that can be accomplished with one dressing.

Israeli Bandage – invented by an Israeli military medic and manufactured in Israel, these bandages are designed to stop blood loss in non-fatally wounded people. Since the tactic for caring for wounded on the spot has become a life saving technique, the Israeli dressing is the bandage of choice of US military medics, emergency medical services and law enforcement personnel.  Available in 4, 6 and 8” wide, this bandage has a sterile non-adhering dressing that can be removed without reopening the wound. A pressure plate  is placed directly over the wound to stop bleeding. The wrapping techniques applies pressure.

It also has a C clamp to hold the bandage closed without tape that can be secured by a simple sliding motion with one hand. This can be self applied.  The Israeli bandage can be used as a splint with the addition of a straight solid object to keep the broken limb immobilized or serve as a partial tourniquet. One form of this bandage has two pads to deal with through and through wounds. The exit wound often bleeds more profusely than the entrance, so place the largest pad over the exit wound and adjust the second to cover the entrance wound. Watch this training video.

Add Wound Dressings to Your First Aid Kit

 

Additional Articles in the April 2014 Issue:

  • A reminder to review and rotate three types of items in your 72 hour emergency kit.
  • A discussion of the importance of “duck and cover” in surviving a nuclear attack
  • What are your plans to provide protein in your diet in an emergency situation? Here are some items to add to your supplies
  • Are members of your family hearing impaired that might not hear a smoke alarm?
  • Our featured contributor this month is Tess Pennington of ReadyNutrition.com. She shares an article about Bio Mass Briquettes. Now you’ll have an environmentally friendly use for those shredded documents.
  • Sun Ovens are a perfect partner for bio mass briquettes, here’s how …
  • Some of our friends have complained that their yards were so shady that they doubted they could grow anything in a garden. In answer to their questions, here are some plants that can be grown in shade. Don’t give up on your yard either. Read more
  • Speaking of gardening, do you use Epsom salts? Here’s why.
  • Our Solar Chef has included a wonderful recipe for Solar Stuffed Shells. Give it a try, these are yummy.

Billie Nicholson, Editor
April 2014

Gardening with Epsom Salt

Billie Nicholson

      epsom saltDid your grand parents use Epsom salt for something more than a hot tub bath after a hard day’s work? In addition to human health and wellness, it can help garden plants thrive, too. Epsom salt, Magnesium Sulfate, gets it’s name from the town of Epsom, England, where it was first distilled from water in the late 1500’s. It works to correct a magnesium or sulfur deficiency in the soil as an “organic fertilizer.”

Magnesium is an essential element in the chlorophyll molecule that allows plants to be able to convert light into energy. Photosynthesis is the chemical process that makes this conversion of light into energy-rich glucose molecules using water and carbon dioxide. It is the basis for life.1  Magnesium aids in nitrogen and phosphorus absorption and helps seeds germinate. Sulfur is an ingredient in two of the amino acids, methionine and cysteine, necessary to synthesize proteins. It also aids in other nutrient absorption.  The chemical compound, magnesium sulfate, is a highly soluble soil amendment, which means it can be absorbed by plants through their leaves as well as through their roots. It is also pH neutral, so it will not alter the soil pH. It promotes growth, color and overall plant health.2

Before you plant, add one cup of Epsom salt to every 100 square feet of soil. Mix it in thoroughly. If you have already planted, lightly sprinkle it over the newly planted area and water in with a hose sprinkler. Once plants are established, make a liquid fertilizer mixture of one tablespoon Epsom Salt to each gallon of water and apply four times during the season.3 Tomatoes and peppers are prone to magnesium deficiency. Add a tablespoon or two per hole before planting seeds or transplants and supplement with the liquid as they grow and develop fruit.

Epsom salt can revitalize your garden. It does not cause a chemical build up in the soil or harm plants when used.  Many gardeners credit their garden success to Epsom salt applications.

References

  1. http://drsircus.com/medicine/magnesium/magnesium-the-lamp-of-life
  2. http://www.ehow.com/way_5714066_much-salt-should-put-plants_.html
  3. http://www.saltworks.us/gardening-with-epsom-salt.asp

 

Additional Articles in the April 2014 Issue:

  • A reminder to review and rotate three types of items in your 72 hour emergency kit.
  • A discussion of the importance of “duck and cover” in surviving a nuclear attack
  • What are your plans to provide protein in your diet in an emergency situation? Here are some items to add to your supplies
  • Are members of your family hearing impaired that might not hear a smoke alarm?
  • Our featured contributor this month is Tess Pennington of ReadyNutrition.com. She shares an article about Bio Mass Briquettes. Now you’ll have an environmentally friendly use for those shredded documents.
  • Sun Ovens are a perfect partner for bio mass briquettes, here’s how …
  • Some of our friends have complained that their yards were so shady that they doubted they could grow anything in a garden. In answer to their questions, here are some plants that can be grown in shade. Don’t give up on your yard either. Read more
  • We can all be prepared to take the initiative to save a life, should we be faced with a life or death situation. Here are three critical first aid procedures that can be accomplished with one dressing.
  • Our Solar Chef has included a wonderful recipe for Solar Stuffed Shells. Give it a try, these are yummy.

Billie Nicholson, Editor
April 2014

What Vegetables Grow in the Shade?

Some of our friends have complained that their yards were so shady that they doubted they could grow anything in a garden. In answer to their questions, here are some plants that can be grown in shade. Don’t give up on your yard either. Vegetables grown for their leaves, stems or buds can tolerate shade better than those grown for their fruit or roots, although some of these can tolerate light shade. Their size or yield may be affected, but they will still taste good.

Leaf LettuceLeaf Lettuce - is one of the first plants up in our garden each year. It thrives in soil of most any type, but does best in moisture retentive soil with some compost available. Our garden beds get partial shade from a neighbor’s oak trees. This has been a benefit as the summer temperatures rise. Lettuce often wants to bolt, or go to bloom, as the temperatures rise. One gardener suggested planting lettuce north of a row of sunflowers that can provide partial shade making the lettuce bear longer. You don’t have to wait until the plants get really large to begin harvesting. Cut the leaves individually with scissors. The plants will continue to produce new leaves. Leaves will get bitter as the plants begin to bloom.

 

Green OnionsGreen Onions - are cold hardy and can tolerate partial shade. We plant green onions starting in the fall in Pensacola and add a few more bulbs each month to assure we have green onions into summer. Good companions for onions are potatoes and lettuce. Cut the green tops for sauteing or garnishing. As they grow larger, the white bulbs can be harvested, too. Onions like a little organic fertilizer or compost. Harvest before the rainy season, they don’t like wet feet and will rot. Use them in potato dishes, with peas, and green beans or steam them in a foil packet on the grill. AllRecipes.com has a green onion pancake recipe.

swiss chardSwiss Chard - likes sun or partial shade and is hardy to about 20ºF. We planted some in January, right before the temperature dropped to 18ºF. We covered them with shade cloth. They suffered some brown edged leaves, but are recovering now. A member of the beet family, they can have green, yellow or red purple stems. Chard can be eaten raw when young in a green salad, added to smoothies, or sauteed in olive oil with garlic and crushed red pepper. This green is best when served immediately after picking. It is loaded with nutrients, second only to spinach. In addition to anti-oxidants, it can also help stabilize blood sugar levels and benefit the pancreas.

sugar snap peasSugar Snap Peas – are one of our most favorite veggies. When the pods start developing, we start hovering with anticipation. The edible pods go a lot farther than the pea seeds. We eat them in green salads, if we can get them to the table, and as part of a sauteed vegetable mix. Sugar snap peas need to be trellised and last longer if grown in light shade. Keep the soil moist. We sprinkle with liquid fertilizer, once they start blooming. Peas contain vitamin C, K, niacin and anti-oxidants. They have the best food value when eaten immediately after harvesting.

Billie Nicholson, Editor 2014

 

Additional Articles in the April 2014 Issue:

  • A reminder to review and rotate three types of items in your 72 hour emergency kit.
  • A discussion of the importance of “duck and cover” in surviving a nuclear attack
  • What are your plans to provide protein in your diet in an emergency situation? Here are some items to add to your supplies
  • Are members of your family hearing impaired that might not hear a smoke alarm?
  • Our featured contributor this month is Tess Pennington of ReadyNutrition.com. She shares an article about Bio Mass Briquettes. Now you’ll have an environmentally friendly use for those shredded documents.
  • Sun Ovens are a perfect partner for bio mass briquettes, here’s how …
  • Speaking of gardening, do you use Epsom salts? Here’s why.
  • We can all be prepared to take the initiative to save a life, should we be faced with a life or death situation. Here are three critical first aid procedures that can be accomplished with one dressing.
  • Our Solar Chef has included a wonderful recipe for Solar Stuffed Shells. Give it a try, these are yummy.

Billie Nicholson, Editor
April 2014

Sun Ovens and Bio Mass Briquettes: A Partnership

slow cooked stew Sun Ovens® are the perfect partner to work with bio mass briquettes on rainy or overcast days. Bio mass briquettes can be burned to begin food preparations on a grill or other open fire. When the food is at least half cooked it can be transferred to a Sun Oven® to complete the process. Even indoors the retained heat of the partially cooked food in the well-insulated Sun Oven® will allow it to be used as a retained heat cooker, often referred to as a Wonder Box.

In addition, the Sun Oven® can be used during the production of bio mass pellets to help the drying process. Just set the pellets in the Sun Oven®, turn one of the door latches inward and set the glass on top leaving a gap between the gasket and the glass to allow moisture to escape.

Additional Articles in the April 2014 Issue:
  • A reminder to review and rotate three types of items in your 72 hour emergency kit.
  • A discussion of the importance of “duck and cover” in surviving a nuclear attack
  • What are your plans to provide protein in your diet in an emergency situation? Here are some items to add to your supplies
  • Are members of your family hearing impaired that might not hear a smoke alarm?
  • Our featured contributor this month is Tess Pennington of ReadyNutrition.com. She shares an article about Bio Mass Briquettes. Now you’ll have an environmentally friendly use for those shredded documents.
  • Some of our friends have complained that their yards were so shady that they doubted they could grow anything in a garden. In answer to their questions, here are some plants that can be grown in shade. Don’t give up on your yard either. Read more
  • Speaking of gardening, do you use Epsom salts? Here’s why.
  • We can all be prepared to take the initiative to save a life, should we be faced with a life or death situation. Here are three critical first aid procedures that can be accomplished with one dressing.
  • Our Solar Chef has included a wonderful recipe for Solar Stuffed Shells. Give it a try, these are yummy.

Billie Nicholson, Editor
April 2014

You Bet Your Life: Check Your Smoke Alarm

Billie and Robert Nicholson

smoke alarm

Image: www.lowenlow.com

We are constantly bombarded with safety messages about checking the batteries in our smoke and carbon monoxide alarms. By this time most of us yawn and say, “yea, yea.” Yet we constantly read or hear of preventable deaths from fires that occur in homes without effective fire alarms. But sometimes just checking batteries and pushing the test button, especially when up close to the alarm, is just not enough.

As the population ages and as some of our veterans returning from war find, a lot of people experience hearing loss. Modern hearing aids are wonderful when worn during our busy day and evening events. But when bedtime comes we take off our hearing aids and go to sleep. Modern fire alarms emit a warning signal in the frequency range of around 3000 hertz (that’s two octaves above middle C on a piano.) According to the Fire Protection Research Foundation, the typical smoke alarm fails to wake up almost 50% of those with hearing loss.

For the person with hearing deficits, more effective smoke alarms include the Lifetone Bedside Fire Alarm and Clock (www.lifetonesafety.com), the Loudenlow Smoke Detector (www.loudenlow.com), and the Silent Call (www.silentcall.com). These special alarms have reported to wake up about 80% of hearing impaired sleepers.

For your safety and piece of mind do the following: Test your smoke alarm to be sure that it will wake you in your bed. Don’t depend on a strobe device. Strobes only alerted about 25% of sleepers. Consider purchasing an alarm that signals you in the low-pitched sound area, close to middle C on the piano and that includes one with a bed shaker.

A lot of people dream of their 15 minutes of fame. Don’t let your story end with “Died of Smoke Inhalation”. For more fun information on fire safety visit www.sparky.org  or  www.sparky.org/parents

Additional Articles in the April 2014 Issue:

  • A reminder to review and rotate three types of items in your 72 hour emergency kit.
  • A discussion of the importance of “duck and cover” in surviving a nuclear attack
  • What are your plans to provide protein in your diet in an emergency situation? Here are some items to add to your supplies
  • Our featured contributor this month is Tess Pennington of ReadyNutrition.com. She shares an article about Bio Mass Briquettes. Now you’ll have an environmentally friendly use for those shredded documents.
  • Sun Ovens are a perfect partner for bio mass briquettes, here’s how …
  • Some of our friends have complained that their yards were so shady that they doubted they could grow anything in a garden. In answer to their questions, here are some plants that can be grown in shade. Don’t give up on your yard either. Read more
  • Speaking of gardening, do you use Epsom salts? Here’s why.
  • We can all be prepared to take the initiative to save a life, should we be faced with a life or death situation. Here are three critical first aid procedures that can be accomplished with one dressing.
  • Our Solar Chef has included a wonderful recipe for Solar Stuffed Shells. Give it a try, these are yummy.

 Billie Nicholson, Editor
April 2014

Alternative Protein Sources

What are your plans to provide alternative protein sources in an emergency situation?

As you collect canned goods don’t forget about this vital nutrient. The human body is nearly half protein, found in muscles, blood, antibodies and enzymes which make other body functions work. Often commercially processed meats are loaded with salt to enhance the flavor.  There are other sources. Here are some items to consider adding to your supplies.

  1. Nuts and Seeds – are high in protein and healthy fats. If you buy them prepackaged, they are ready to eat. They only last six months to a year, depending on the type of nut. Their high oil content reduces shelf life. Peanut butter is high in protein and available dried.
  2. Beans - are one of the longest cultivated plants, easy to digest and high in fiber. They also help maintain stable blood sugar levels by slowing the rate of carbohydrate absorption.1 Dried beans are economical and store well for an extended period of time. Store them in jars or mylar bags with oxygen absorbers. They will require water for presoaking before cooking, so plan ahead when preparing them. Cook with anise or coriander seeds to reduce flatulence as they’re digested by microbes in your intestine. There are lots of varieties for your culinary pleasure. Canned beans can be eaten right after opening, even cold in a power down situation.
  3. Chia Seeds - have double the amount of protein found in other seeds. Humans began eating chia seeds around 3500 BC. Aztecs and Mayans considered them magical because they increased stamina and energy over long periods. Chia seeds are high in fiber, omega fatty acids, calcium, and antioxidants as well. Because they absorb 12 times their weight, their expansion in your stomach will curb your appetite.
  4. Protein Powders – are available in three common forms, whey, soy and casein. Whey is the most popular because it is a water-soluble milk protein. It contains all nine amino acids necessary to build proteins in the human body. Soy has been favored by vegans, but recently it has been associated with altering estrogen balance. Casein powder is used with cheese production.
  5. Textured Vegetable Protein (TVP) - is produced from soy flour after the oil has been extracted. It is cooked under pressure, extruded and dried. Soy flour has a long shelf life if kept in a cool, dry place. With varying flavors added, it can taste like sausage, beef, ham, bacon or chicken. Easily rehydrated, it is economical and an excellent meat substitute or meal extender. One ounce of TVP is the equivalent of three ounces of meat.
  6. Freeze-dried Meat - has the water removed through sublimation, which turns water molecules into vapor. Freeze-drying food affects meat’s texture more than other preservation techniques. They are extremely light and easy to carry but more expensive to purchase. While some fruits taste great freeze-dried, meat will need to be rehydrated.
  7. Powdered Eggs and Milk – made by spray drying, the process removes nearly all of the water prohibiting the growth of microorganisms. Non-fat dried milk is best for long term storage.  Eggs are available as whole, yolks and whites. Store cool and dry. Refrigerate when opened.

Billie Nicholson, Editor 2014

References

1 http://readynutrition.com/resources/the-top-5-protein-sources-for-your-shtf-diet_27032013/

2 http://www.doctoroz.com/blog/lindsey-duncan-nd-cn/chia-ancient-super-secret

3 https://www.usaemergencysupply.com/information_center/all_about_textured_vegetable_protein.htm

Additional Articles in the April 2014 Issue:

  • A reminder to review and rotate three types of items in your 72 hour emergency kit.
  • A discussion of the importance of “duck and cover” in surviving a nuclear attack
  • Are members of your family hearing impaired that might not hear a smoke alarm?
  • Our featured contributor this month is Tess Pennington of ReadyNutrition.com. She shares an article about Bio Mass Briquettes. Now you’ll have an environmentally friendly use for those shredded documents.
  • Sun Ovens are a perfect partner for bio mass briquettes, here’s how …
  • Some of our friends have complained that their yards were so shady that they doubted they could grow anything in a garden. In answer to their questions, here are some plants that can be grown in shade. Don’t give up on your yard either. Read more …
  • Speaking of gardening, do you use Epsom salts? Here’s why.
  • We can all be prepared to take the initiative to save a life, should we be faced with a life or death situation. Here are three critical first aid procedures that can be accomplished with one dressing.
  • Our Solar Chef has included a wonderful recipe for Solar Stuffed Shells. Give it a try, these are yummy.

 Billie Nicholson, Editor
April 2014

What is Civil Defense? Surviving a Nuclear Attack

600px-United_States_Civil_Defense_Roundel.svgBe Prepared for a Nuclear Disaster

Civil Defense is the organized non-military effort to prepare Americans for nuclear military attack. Over the past twenty years the term and training has been replaced by the Federal Emergency Management Agency, FEMA. Established in 1979 and absorbed into the Department of Homeland Security in 2003,1   the focus has shifted to protection against terrorism to create a safer, more secure America. This federal government organization provides the coordinated federal response in the event of a terrorist attack. According to their website, they are tasked with coordinating a response to any large natural disaster or other emergency event to  facilitate a swift and effective recovery effort.2 Examples of their work include restoration along the East and Gulf Coast following hurricanes Sandy and Katrina. Their biggest strengths lie in an ability to unify the effort, find the needed assets to solve a problem and eventually get the work done.DHS.gov

A big question remains. What if someone slips through the layers of surveillance and security and launches a “nuclear attack”?  What do we do?

What Happens in a Nuclear Disaster?

There are six types of nuclear disasters: dirty bombs, nuclear plant meltdowns, fallout from another country’s atomic bomb explosion, a singular nuclear strike in the US, a suitcase nuke, and all out war. There are three parts to nuclear explosions: the explosion with its initial bright flash of light and heat as mega tons of energy are released accompanied in a few seconds by a debris-filled pressure wave followed by alpha, beta and gamma radiation or chemical dust also know as fallout.  If you see a bright flash, don’t run to the window to see what’s coming next. It will be the shattering glass from the window you’re looking out.

Your first response should be duck and cover. Find the closest solid structure and duck down, covering your head with your arms. If there is no structure near, lay flat on the ground, face down. Stay down for at least 30 seconds.3 A blast wave and wind traveling at the speed of sound or about 5 seconds per mile will follow. A huge blast may cause temporary blindness resulting in disorientation. When you can, move to a protected place that is not damaged. Immediately cover your nose and mouth with an article of clothing to reduce the chance of breathing in smoke or radioactive dust.  Stay away from windows because the blast wave will blow out windows and some walls. Gamma rays travel so fast you can’t avoid them. Anyone within one thousand feet of a detonation will most likely be killed. If you survived, get inside. Once inside, remove your outer layer of clothing and shower and wash your hair as soon as possible. Discard all these items. This will remove up to 90% of contaminants. If you develop nausea and vomiting within 4 hours after the blast, chances are you have permanent damage. There are some medical processes that can help if you can get to a location offering them.

After the blast, the fallout is deadly.  Get as far inside a structure as possible and have as much material above you as possible to block the beta radiation. Dust contaminated with radiation will be everywhere. Below ground shelters are best if they are three feet below the surface. Dust will travel with the prevailing winds. The majority of contamination will have fallen in three days. When you are ready to evacuate, cover as much of you as possible. Use a mask, gloves and wear eye protection. Duct tape your sleeves and pant legs. Remove and discard this clothing before reentering a shelter. If you travel, go in a perpendicular direction to the wind flow. Begin to take iodine tablets immediately to prevent thyroid damage. The non-radioactive iodine saturates the thyroid gland so it can’t absorb radioactive iodine. If you don’t have tablets, apply betadine to the skin of your abdomen and arms for 3-5 days. Stored food and water will be critical. Make sure you have some.4

References:

1 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_civil_defense

2 http://www.dhs.gov/building-resilient-nation

3.https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QhDi0zoTcSo

4 http://www.alertsusa.com/reports/goodnews.pdf

 

Additional Articles in the April 2014 Issue:

  • A reminder to review and rotate three types of items in your 72 hour emergency kit.
  • What are your plans to provide protein in your diet in an emergency situation? Here are some items to add to your supplies …
  • Are members of your family hearing impaired that might not hear a smoke alarm?
  • Our featured contributor this month is Tess Pennington of ReadyNutrition.com. She shares an article about Bio Mass Briquettes. Now you’ll have an environmentally friendly use for those shredded documents.
  • Sun Ovens are a perfect partner for bio mass briquettes, here’s how …
  • Some of our friends have complained that their yards were so shady that they doubted they could grow anything in a garden. In answer to their questions, here are some plants that can be grown in shade. Don’t give up on your yard either. Read more …
  • Speaking of gardening, do you use Epsom salts? Here’s why.
  • We can all be prepared to take the initiative to save a life, should we be faced with a life or death situation. Here are three critical first aid procedures that can be accomplished with one dressing.
  • Our Solar Chef has included a wonderful recipe for Solar Stuffed Shells. Give it a try, these are yummy.

 Billie Nicholson, Editor
April 2014

 

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