What’s in Your Every Day Carry Kit?

Are You Prepared Every Day?

 Every Day CarryNot long ago I attended a bridal shower where one of the games gave points for a list of items in your purse.  As I went down the list, a picture of preparedness emerged. All of us have items we carry every day, like photo identification in the form of driver’s license, credit cards, membership cards, cell phones, and money. Don’t confuse this with a Bug-Out-Bag or the emergency kit you have in your car. In an emergency, if you couldn’t get to your auto or home, how would you get along? What do you carry with you every day?

What Do You Carry?

The items you carry everyday are often based on your health, profession and vanity. By rethinking these with a preparedness mindset, perhaps you may modify what’s in your EDC. We are limited by how much weight we are willing to carry and how we attach it to us. We are also limited by the number of pockets in clothing and by the number of free hands we have, so minimalism is critical.

      The items in your EDC will be determined by several factors: do you live in an urban or rural place, where do you go every day, are you traveling on public transportation or on foot, what is the climate and the season of the year, is your route socially safe, and what are the local laws regarding what you carry?

Add These to Your Every Day Carry Kit

  • Items that can help you get food like coins, cash or other small barter items.
  • Energy bars that are high in calories and have a long shelf life.
  • A 3 day’s supply of any medicine that you take regularly.
  • Water purification tablets or a straw water filter and an empty (for storage) wide mouth water bottle.
  • A Mylar survival blanket can provide shelter.
  • Tools that will help you scavenge for food, like a Swiss Army knife or Leatherman multi-tool.
  • Remember the Speedhook?
  • Edible plant guide.
  • Fire starter or lighter to build a fire to cook food on or keep you warm.
  • Cell phones can contain emergency contact information. Even without service you can call 911.
  • Rope or string, including unflavored dental floss or 550 paracord, for many binding purposes.
  • Mini flashlight will provide light when you need it. Check batteries every few months.
  • Personal protection devices (where permitted by law) can range from a whistle, pepper spray, self defense tools like tactical pens to hand guns.
  • Hand sanitizers will help you avoid infection if you are exposed to others that are ill or if you sustain a wound. Bandaids got me extra points at the bridal shower.
  • If you wear contacts or glasses, extras are a must along with saline packets.
  • Remember knowledge trumps equipment every day of the week.

      Whatever items you choose for your Every Day Carry, make sure you know how to use them.

Billie Nicholson, editor

October 2014

Additional articles in this month’s issue:

Prepper Camp™ Recap
Emergency Medical Assessment 
How’s Your Battery Health?  
10 things You’ll Regret Not Having Enough of When the SHTF by Elise Xavier,
Waste Not … Want Not… Making Apple Cider Vinegar
Escaping a Riot

Our Solar Chef presents Solar Apple Potato Soup

Prepper Camp™ Recap

Prepper Camp

In the foothills of western North Carolina, over 600 serious preparedness citizens gathered for a 3-day, total immersion experience in survival at Prepper Camp™. Attendees had opportunities to learn from the best in the business about topics ranging from alternative power solutions, cheese making, first aid, herbal medicine, how to grow a camouflaged food forest, solar cooking and water filtration. In addition, they had time to talk to vendors and practice some of the skills they learned during evening activities as they camped on the meeting site.

Prepper Camp™

 

Billie  Nicholson, editor

October 2014

Additional articles in this month’s issue:

What’s in Your Every Day Carry Kit?
Emergency Medical Assessment  
How’s Your Battery Health?  
10 things You’ll Regret Not Having Enough of When the SHTF by Elise Xavier, 
Waste Not … Want Not… Making Apple Cider Vinegar
Escaping a Riot

Our solar Chef presents Solar Apple Soup

 

 

The One That Got Away

Robert Nicholson

Speedhook

When I go fishing, I always remember the story that my father used to tell. It was about “the one that got away”.  Now is the time to prepare when there may not be enough food to go around by honing fishing and trapping skills. But how exactly can you do that? There is no one single magic step to prepare, but many small steps may give you the advantage you need to provide for your family. Fishing from a number of lakes and streams may not be an original idea, but there are still some things which may give you the edge over other fishermen, like fishing after dark with a light, etc., if you prepare in advance. When fishing a lake, stick to the windward side, where wave action stirs up more morsels of food, hence more fish are found there. If nothing bites, whack the water once or twice with a stick. Sometimes this really works because it wakes sleeping fish. Fish early morning or late afternoon, and don’t forget the mosquito repellant.

I discovered a company that markets a “Speedhook”. The Regular Speedhook is specifically designed for survival applications and is so effective, it is outlawed for non-survival use in some areas like Minnesota. This small device can be used for fishing and trapping. The Speedhook works like a spring-loaded trap and when a fish, or other small animal, “takes the bait”, it automatically springs open setting the hook. This is the same great Speedhook device as the one included in the military fishing and trapping kit. This is a perfect supplement to the emergency fishing kit required by Alaskan and Canadian Aviation Regulations. No fishing pole is required as fishing line is included.

The Speedhook comes in two versions, a basic setup and a military version complete with artificial dehydrated bait. Both versions include full instructions. Either version can also be used to snare small animals like birds, squirrels and chipmunks. If you are lost in the woods a diet made up of these small animals may just save your life.

The kit is available at www.SpeedHook.com and the company also offers other small emergency items not easily found. Don’t let your fishing story be about “the one that got away.”

June 2013 

Be Disaster Aware

Be Disaster Aware The chances that your family will survive a disaster depends as much on your family planning as it does on local governmental agencies like police, fire and rescue. Families should have the tools and plans to support and protect themselves for at least the first three days (72 hours) into a disaster. Research on personal preparedness shows that many people who think they’re prepared are really NOT. In addition, some admit that they do not plan to prepare at all. Our nation’s emergency planners, fire fighters, EMT/Paramedics and law enforcement officers do an unbelievable job of keeping us safe, but they can’t do it alone. The biggest challenge is motivating everyone to participate in disaster preparedness activities. Knowing what to do before, during and after an emergency is critical to being prepared. It may make the difference between life and death. When we accept the personal responsibility to become prepared, we participate in the safety and security of our neighborhoods and communities. September is National Preparedness Month.

  1. Get a kit
  2. Make a Plan
  3. Be Informed, Get Involved 
  4. Do It NOW.

BE PREPARED

Additional Articles in September 2014 newsletter include:

Leadership: Restoring order during catastrophic chaos

Growing your own food all year

Home Security Checklist

Emergency Preparedness for people with disabilities

Introducing the UV Paqlite

Solar Moroccan Style Meatballs from our Solar Chef

Leadership: Restoring Order During Catastrophic Chaos

from a presentation by Travis Waack

As a part of the Summer of Survival webinar series, Travis Waack shared the following information about leadership and organization during a disaster. These notes were taken during that talk and are supplemented by additional details from an ICS pdf from epa.gov.   Editor

Leadership during a catastrophe

Sometimes we have warnings of coming disasters, sometimes we don’t. Whenever they occur, the first noticeable problem is a lack of communication among the citizens of the area affected and among those involved in providing rescue and recovery. In a culture of preparedness, like our readers, we need to recognize the problems and develop ways to control the situation, not just crisis manage, for the benefit of our families and our communities.

Incident Command System

The Incident Command System (ICS) was developed following a series of California wildfires which caused millions in damage and the death of several people. Local, state and federal fire authorities collaborated to form FIRESCOPE (Firefighting Resources of California Organized for Potential Emergencies. This group reviewed the wildfire responses and discovered that poor incident management was to blame, not a lack of resources. Major problems were associated with nonstandard terminology, nonstandard or integrated communication, lack of organizational flexibility, lack of consolidated action plans and lack of designated facilities. ICS was designed to overcome these problems. Following 9/11 this program was nationalized. Today, most major incidents demand so many resources and skills that one local, state, or federal agency couldn’t provide them. The Incident Command System provides a way for many agencies to work together smoothly under one management system.ICS pdf from epa.gov

 Leadership by emergency personnel

Any incident that requires action by emergency service personnel to prevent or minimize loss of life or property or locale damage can be managed by an ICS. It can operate regardless of jurisdictional boundaries and can grow or shrink to meet the needs of the incident. It is designed to develop work accountability and safety, improve communications, enforce a systematic planning process, fully integrate people and supplies, enhance communications to everyone involved and define the chain of command.

Leadership: Restoring Order

Leadership Support Groups

The Incident Commander depends on the information from four supporting groups to provide the necessary information to make final decisions. This command model may have two or more individuals serving as the commander who work as a team. A good commander is responsible for making sure all pieces of the structure are working together properly.

  •      The Operations section does the work; they are the boots on the ground doing the response to whatever the emergency may be. 
  •      The Planning section provides support information. They know what resources are available and collaborate with operations to write incident actions plans – which are objectives for the next day.
  •      The Logistics section procures materials and supplies; obtains and manages facilities; supports workers with food, lodging and medical care. They provide radio communications and IT support.    
  •      Finance & Administration is in charge of paying for supplies, processing compensation and tracking costs and statistics.  

     Each role can be adapted to meet the needs of a Prepper network. A deliberate process will be essential if a group is to be led during a catastrophic chaos. Consider this system for your community.

Additional articles in the September 2014 newsletter include:

Growing your own food all year

Home Security Checklist

Emergency Preparedness for people with disabilities

Introducing the UV Paqlite

Solar Moroccan Style Meatballs from our Solar Chef

Be Disaster Aware

Growing Your Own Food All Year

As the summer season draws to a close, many gardeners wish for a longer growing season. Never fear, the answers are here. There are several things that the everyday gardener can do to extend the growing season for our gardens. As the weather cools, it is time to select new seeds or slips to plant that can tolerate cooler temperatures. Just as in the spring we planted lettuce, radishes, beets and carrots, the same pattern can be repeated in the fall. In addition, you can add more cold tolerant vegetables that will produce leaves and roots to eat. These can be divided into temperature tolerances, for example:

  • growing your own food all year

    http://www.RustyBuggy.com

    Low temperature tolerant plants that can grow outside but are very sensitive to frost

    • lettuce
    • chickory, endive, escarole
    • broccoli
    • cauliflower
    • parsley, cilantro
    • radishes, celery, bok choy
  •     Medium cold tolerant plants can grow outside but it helps to cover them as the temperature
    Grow Your Own Food All Year

    http://www.RustyBuggy.com

    drops

    • Chinese cabbage, sorrel
    • rutabaga
    • collards, kale, spinach
    • beets
    • carrots
    • parsnips
    • snow peas
  • High cold tolerant may survive uncovered but can be protected by
    Grow Your Own Food All Year

    http://www.thebittenword.com

    row cover

    • turnips
    • Brussels sprouts
    • cabbage

 

 

The most important factor is knowing when to plant in the fall. As the weather gets cooler and day length decreases, plant growth slows down and will eventually come to a stop when the day length gets below 10 hours. In much of the US, land north of the 30º latitude has day length shorter than 10 hours between mid-November and mid-January. Check your location here. Your goal is to get plants to maturity before that day length happens. If you get them nearly mature, they will hold in the ground until you harvest them. Review the maturation date on the seed packets and plant those seeds within a time that will work. You can vary planting days to stretch your harvest. Pay attention as the night temperature begins to drop. Cover plants that are most delicate upon threats of frost. Find your average frost dates here.

There are several techniques to protect plants as the temperatures drop.

  1. Plant your garden in a south facing field. These beds will get more sun exposure and soil will retain heat longer each day.
  2. Protect from wind. Wind can cause more damage than cold. Planting near a protective wall, fence or hedge can raise the air  temperature several degrees
  3. Plant in cold frames. These boxes are constructed with slanted walls and designed to have a topGrowing Your Own Food All Year cover of plastic or glass. The top can be raised during the day and during watering but replaced at night when temperatures may drop to the frost level.  There are many ways to build cold frames, but the idea is to create a warm place for plants to continue growing. See  “The Cold Frame Handbook”  to get plans and more details.
  4. Grow Your Own Food All YearUse row covers. Made from wire or 1/2” PVC electrical conduit pipe bent into the ground. A 10’ pipe can be bent to cover a 5-6’ bed. Use sand bags to secure at each hoop or insert a small piece of rebar in each end . Cover with spun fabric which is light weight, translucent, and breathable. This will provide wind protection and increase ground temperatures 5-10º F. Fabric that is made to 1 oz thickness allows 70% sunlight through. You can double this cover in real cold weather. Be sure to take it off during the warmest part of the day. Get precise construction directions here.
  5. Greenhouses are the final answer for those gardeners who feel the need for dirty fingers all year
    Grow Your Own Food All Year

    http://homedecorreport.com/tips-for-building-glass-house-easily-3083/greenhouse-kits/

    long. The sky is the limit for greenhouse kits. They can range in size from table-top starter boxes to arboretums. They can be attached or free standing. A greenhouse should be large enough to walk into. The frame cover can be plastic sheets, vinyl panels or glass inserts. You will need a source of water, vents and perhaps a fan to make it most useful. Here is an extensive article on “Choosing the Best Greenhouse Kit” . In locations that have harsh winters, use row  covers in the green house.

References:

http://www.BorntoGrow.net

http://www.BeyondOffGrid.com

http://www.fourseasonfarm.com/books/

Additional articles in the September 2014 newsletter include:

Home Security Checklist

Emergency Preparedness for people with disabilities

Introducing the UV Paqlite

Solar Moroccan Style Meatballs from our Solar Chef

Be Disaster Aware

Leadership: Restoring order during catastrophic chaos

UV Paqlite – Never Needs Batteries

UV-PaqliteHave you ever reached for a flashlight only to find the batteries were dead? The problem with most emergency light sources is that they require batteries which die and need to be replaced at the most inconvenient times. Batteries are troublesome and require a steady stream of purchases. Re-chargeable batteries need to be charged but how often do we forget to keep them charged? We have found an intriguing product that solves all those problems. Introducing the UV Paqlite:

UV_PaqliteFacts

  • The UV Paqlite (U-V- Pack- Light) is a reusable light source designed to provide a night light illumination in an enclosed environment all night long.
  • UV Paqlites contain glow crystals that are rechargeable in light and last forever.
  • Packaged in a vacuum sealed bag, it is lightweight, waterproof, and portable.
  • The UV Paqlite quickly absorbs light from any source to charge, glows in the dark for 10 hours, and can be reused indefinitely forever. It is fully charged with 1 minute of direct sunlight exposure, in 5-10 minutes in ambient room light, or just a few seconds when exposed to a flashlight.
  • The glowing photons captured in this product are composed of strontium, aluminum and other rare earth elements, but not radioactive uranium.
  • They have an indefinite shelf life and can be stored anywhere.

 

Sun Ovens® leaves no stone unturned to find unique products for our customers. Just like our ovens, this product uses FREE energy. The Paqlite folks made us a deal we couldn’t refuse and we’re passing the savings on to you. While supplies last, get the large UV Paqlites at a special price.

Buy one, get the second one for 1/2 price. The more you buy, the more you save!

 

To view a video, learn more, and Order Yours Today: Click here http://www.sunoven.com/Paqlites

 

Additional articles in the September 2014 newsletter include:

Home Security Checklist

Emergency Preparedness for people with disabilities

Solar Moroccan Style Meatballs from our Solar Chef

Be Disaster Aware

Leadership: Restoring order during catastrophic chaos

Growing your own food all year

Emergency Preparedness for People with Disabilities

Prepare for emergenciesPeople with disabilities need to prepare for emergencies, too.

The likelihood that you and your family will recover from an emergency tomorrow often depends on the planning and preparation done today. While each person’s abilities and needs are unique, every individual can take steps to prepare for all kinds of emergencies from fires and floods to potential terrorist attacks. By evaluating your own personal needs and making an emergency plan that fits those needs, you and your loved ones can be better prepared. For people with special needs disabilities, being prepared is a matter of life or death. If you are on your own, you need to have a plan.

The first step is to consider how an emergency might affect your individual needs.

Think about a given day, what do you do, what do you need and who can help you? Work on a plan to make it on your own for at least three to five days. It is possible in an emergency that you will not have ready access to a medical facility or pharmacy. Basic supplies for survival include food, water and clean air. Consider assembling two kits. One to use at home and one to take with you if you have to leave home.

Recommended basic emergency supplies include:

*    Water, one gallon of water per person per day for at least three days, for drinking and sanitation
*    Food, at least a three-day supply of non-perishable food and a can opener if kit contains canned food and where possible, extra medication.
*    Battery-powered or hand crank radio and a NOAA Weather Radio with tone alert and extra batteries for both
*    Flashlight and extra batteries for any necessary electronic equipment
*    First aid kit; a week’s supply of any prescription medicines; include copies of all prescriptions and dosage instructions; copies of medical insurance, Medicare and Medicaid cards; instruction for operating any equipment or life-saving devices you rely on
*    Whistle to signal for help
*    Dust mask to help filter contaminated air and plastic sheeting and duct tape to shelter-in-place
*    Moist towelettes, garbage bags and plastic ties for personal sanitation
*    Wrench or pliers to turn off utilities
*    Local maps
*    Pet food, extra water, collar with ID tag and supplies for your pet or service animal

Make a plan for what you will do in an emergency.

Write it down and keep it with your emergency supply kit. For every aspect of your daily routine, plan an alternative procedure. Create a personal support network. Share your plans with them and make sure that someone in your support network has a key to your home and knows where you keep your emergency supplies. Practice it. Keep a list of network contact information in your wallet. If you need to evacuate, select a shelter that can accommodate your needs.

It’s important to stay informed about what might happen and know what types of emergencies are likely to affect your region. For more information about preparing for emergencies for people with disabilities, click here for a printable document.

Information from Ready.gov

Additional Articles in September 2014 newsletter include:

Leadership: Restoring order during catastrophic chaos

Growing your own food all year

Home Security Checklist

Introducing the UV Paqlite

Solar Moroccan Style Meatballs from our Solar Chef

Be Disaster Aware

Home Security Check List

Use this guide as you check your home for safety measures. Column “no” indicates areas where you could take action to improve your home’s security. These are just some of of the steps you can take to decrease the likelihood that you or your home is targeted.

Exterior Doors                                                                               Yes               No

  • All doors are locked at night and every time we leave the house – even for
    just a few minutes.
  • 

Doors are solid hardwood or metal-clad.
  • Doors feature wide-angle peepholes at heights everyone can use.
  • If there are glass panels in or near our doors, they are reinforced in some
    way so they can not be shattered.
  • All Entryways have a working, keyed entry lock and sturdy deadbolt lock
    installed into the frame of the door.
  • Spare keys are kept with a trusted neighbor, not under a doormat or
    planter, on a ledge, or in a mailbox.

Garage Sliding Doors

  • The door leading from an attached garage into the house is solid wood
    or metal-clad with a keyed door lock and deadbolt.
  • The overhead garage door has has a lock.
  • Garage doors are all locked when leaving the house.
  • The sliding glass door has a strong, key lock.
  • A dowel or pin to secure a glass door has been installed to prevent lifting
    off track. It is locked every night.

Windows

  • Every window in your house has a working key lock or is security pinned.
  • Windows are always locked, even when they are opened a few inches for
    ventilation.

Outdoor Security

  • Shrubs and bushes are trimmed so there are no hiding places.
  • There are no dark areas around our house, garage, or yard that could
    hide prowlers.
  • Every outside door has a bright, working light to illuminate visitors.
  • Floodlights are used appropriately to ensure effective illumination.
  • Outdoor lights are on in the evening – on an auto timer, photo-cell or
    motion sensors.
  • Our house number, is clearly displayed so police and other emergency
    vehicles can find the house quickly.

Security When Away from Home

  • At least two light timers have been set to lights on and off in logical
    sequence.
  • Alarm system has been activated when leaving home.
  • Mail and newspaper deliveries stopped.
  • A neighbor will tend the yard and watch the house while we’re away.

Outdoor Valuables and Personal Property

  • Gate latches, garage doors, and shed doors are all locked with high-security, laminated padlocks.
  • Gate latches, garage doors, and shed doors are locked after every use.
  • Grills, lawn mowers, and other valuables are stored in a locked garage or shed, or if left out in the open, are hidden from view with a tarp and securely locked to a stationary point.
  • Every Bicycle is secured with a U-bar lock or quality padlock and chain.
  • Bikes are always locked, even if we leave them for just a minute.
  • Firearms are stored unloaded and locked in storage boxes and secured with trigger guard locks.
  • Valuable items, such as television, stereos, and computers have been inscribed with identifying number approved by local police.
  • Our home inventory is up-to-date and includes pictures. A complete copy is kept somewhere out of the house.

Additional Articles in September 2014 newsletter include:

Leadership: Restoring order during catastrophic chaos

Growing your own food all year

Emergency Preparedness for people with disabilities

Introducing the UV Paqlite

Solar Moroccan Style Meatballs from our Solar Chef

Be Disaster Aware

Solar Cooking for A Rainy Day

Bacon!

Bacon! It seems like everyone loves bacon. But before I had a Sun Oven it was something I rarely ate at home. I hated the way the smell permeated the entire house and nine times out of ten I burnt it to beyond a crisp. Maybe that explains the unpleasant aroma. With the Sun Oven bacon is easy. However, it’s still an occasional food around our house; so much so that if I don’t cook the entire package in one go the uncooked portion will likely spoil. Luckily, cooked bacon will keep in the fridge for about a week and because it already cooked it easily finds its way into soups, salads, and sandwiches. I’ve even started saving and using the fat. Use two baking pans, with or without racks, to fit a full pound of bacon in the Sun Oven. Cross-stack them on the leveling tray. Bacon is on of the few things that can burn in the Sun Oven so start checking on it after half an hour or so. Take it out as soon as it’s ready. The top tray will cook a little faster. Don’t let its bacony goodness cause you to forget about the bottom one.

Bacon! and Cat!

 

Join The Every Needful Thing Newsletter

  • Helpful Preparedness Tips
  • Solar cooking Recipes
  • Preparedness product reviews and promotions

The monthly resource for emergency preparedness and food storage specialists, and their family, friends and neighbors.

argoz