Honoring Nelson Mandela

 

The life of Nelson Mandela is one of the most inspirational stories of recent times. His example offers

valuable lessons on the importance of personal resistance to evil, and the redemptive power of forgiveness.

In 2004 Nelson Mandela took the time to visit a Sun Oven project. He came to participate in the

dedication of the first solar powered bakery in Eastern Cape, South Africa. The project established a

model solar powered Sun-Bakery in the rural community of Willowvale, to bake bread and generate

income for HIV positive women. He expressed a personal interest in the project and heartfelt concern for

the community. His warmth and gentleness won the hearts of everyone he came in contact with. He has

been loved by many.

Nelson Mandela

Cynthia Campher, Director of the Women’s Advise Centre, and Paul Munsen,
President of SUN OVENS International, Inc. serve sun-baked chicken to Nelson Mandela.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

south_africa_eastern_cape_map

Eastern Cape, South Africa

 

 

 

 

 

 

Paul Munsen

Nelson Mandela

 

 

 

 

 

 

Paul Munsen explains solar cooking to Nelson Mandela and other participants.

 

Dehydrating Apples in a Sun Oven®

Apple harvest time this year produced lots of fruit. We canned slices, made apple sauce and dried some. The SunOven® works well as a fruit dehydrator. First we set the SunOven® outside, but not focused on the sun. We wanted a slight preheat but to less than 100º.   Apples were washed and aligned in a Norpro “Apple Master”, an apple peeler, corer, and slicer. A few turns of the handle made quick work of the first apple. Slide the apple spiral slices off the core and place them on a cutting board.

dehydrating apples in sun oven

Slice the spiral in half.  Place the apple slices in a solution of water and Fruit Fresh® ascorbic acid (follow directions on bottle) to keep the slices from turning dark.

dehydrating apples in a SunOven®

Cover the drying racks with parchment paper and drain apple slices. Line them up on the racks. Carefully arrange the racks inside the SunOven®. Leave the door latches under the glass door to allow air flow and keep the temperature low inside. We turn the oven so it is behind the sun track. Check at the end of the day. If not completely dry, latch and leave over night. Finish the next day. When slices are dry, remove from racks and pack into a clean glass jar. Add an oxygen absorber and pull a vacuum with a Food Saver® or by hand with a clean brake bleeder. Store cool and dark.

dehydrating apples in a Sun Oven®

November 2013, Every Needful Thing                               Billie A. Nicholson, editor

Sun Ovens® in Haiti

 

Report from Haiti

Haiti is one of the world’s most deforested countries. In some parts of Haiti, families spend up to half of their household income to buy charcoal. It is not uncommon for women to face the dilemma of choosing between buying enough food to feed their family or the charcoal to cook it. To maximize the charcoal’s value, much of the cooking is done in enclosed kitchens, exposing women and children to the harmful effects of smoke.

Haiti

Sun Ovens in Haiti

Sun Ovens International has been working in Haiti since 1998, and is committed to providing an alternative to cooking with charcoal. Haiti is blessed with an abundance of sunshine; the sun can be harnessed as the fuel source for up to 70% of household cooking.

Help Us Help Haiti

During November and December 2013 donations to the Friends of Haiti Organization (FOHO) SUN OVEN® project will matched dollar for dollar.

The cost of each SUN OVEN® with two pots and WAPIs is $199. Donations of any amount will be greatly appreciated.

Credit card donations can be made through the SUN OVEN® website. Donations will be forwarded to FOHO and FOHO will issue a receipt by mail.

FOHO is a 501C3 nonprofit organization so all donations will be tax deductible. 100% of the donation will go directly to sending SUN OVENS® to Haiti; no administrative expenses will be deducted.

To make a donation on line visit: https://www.sunoven.com/products-page/donation/help-us-help-haiti-donation

 

To learn more about our work in Haiti visit: https://www.sunoven.com/haiti

November 2013, Every Needful Thing                    Billie A. Nicholson, editor

The Cultural Challenge of Solar Cooking

Changing Hearts and Minds

Careful research and experience has proven that the challenges of introducing solar cooking in the developing world are far more cultural than they are technical. The GLOBAL SUN OVEN® has been carefully designed to overcome many of the cultural barriers that have limited the success of solar cooking in the past.

While there are a number of cultural challenges that are unique to each people or group, which must be accounted for. The two major obstacles that have limited the success of the wide spread introduction of solar cooking have successfully been over come:

1. In most countries people work while the sun is out and eat their main meal of the day after the sun has set. Food that is cooked in most solar cooking devices must be consumed immediately or it will become cold. The GLOBAL SUN OVEN® is very well insulated, which allows food that is cooked in the afternoon sun to stay warm until it is ready to be consumed later in the evening.

2. In many countries a woman is working from very early in the morning until well after sundown. Many solar cooking devices do not get hot enough requiring the food to be cooked at a lower temperature for a longer period of time. Women are often far too busy to devote additional time to solar cooking. The time required to cook in a GLOBAL SUN OVEN® is comparable to cooking with a wood or charcoal fire, which makes it easier to gain the acceptance of the women who use it.

Sun Ovens are Reaching Around the World  solar oven

(NOTE: Each month, one article will highlight the international efforts of Sun Ovens Internation to benefit developing countries around the globe.)

 

July, 2011 Every Needful Thing
Jason Carlton

First Aid: Healing With Water

Water Has Healing Properties

Did it ever occur to you that if we make the best use of water, we could reduce the amount of sickness and death in the world? From microbes to soap, contaminated water is a major source of diarrhea. An important part of its prevention is to purify water used for drinking and preparing foods. Boiling and filtering water will help make it safe to use.

First Aid: WaterIf cooking fuel is limited, pasteurization (using the WAPI kit in a Sun Oven®) will make water safe for consumption. Hand washing with soap and water before eating or preparing foods and after defecation is important.

 

Babies are especially susceptible to diarrhea. A common cause of death in babies and small children, is severe dehydration. By giving the infant or child plenty of water, this can be prevented, even if given a spoonful at a time.

 Making a Rehydrating Drink

A rehydration drink made with half a teaspoon of salt and 8 teaspoons of sugar per liter (~32 oz.) combined with half a cup of fruit juice, coconut water, or mashed banana will replenish the electrolytes. This should be given often in small sips, every five minutes, until the person begins to urinate normally.

Additional uses of purified water include bathing skin infections, washing wounds, lowering high fevers, hot water vapors to loosen mucus and using hot and cold compresses. When water is used correctly, often medicines are not needed, and the body will heal itself. (“Where There is No Doctor,” Hesperian Health Guides.)

October 2013, every Needful Thing                     Billie A. Nicholson, editor

Evacuating with a Sun Oven®

Don’t Leave Home Without Your SunOven®

Sun OvenEvacuating with you Sun Oven® makes sense. Here’s why. You can pack it full of cold items to eat and drink in the shelter. They will stay cool for some time because of its insulated design. When the storm passes, you will be able to set up outside and make a welcomed hot meal. Don’t forget to take your WAPI kit to be able to pasteurize water, too.

October 2013, Every Needful Thing                                  Billie A. Nicholson, editor

A Sun Oven® in Your Preparedness Plan

Sun OvenDon’t get caught in an emergency situation without a Sun Oven®

Many people consider a Sun Oven® an essential tool in their family emergency plans. A Sun Oven® will enable your family to be better prepared in the following ways:

  1. Water Purification – Pasteurize or boil drinking water.
  2. Food - Boil, bake or steam food. This is the most fuel efficient way to rehydrate freeze-dried and dehydrated foods.
  3. Food Storage - Create your own food storage by dehydrating fruits, vegetables, and meats.
  4. Fuel Storage - Decrease your need for fuel. It is difficult and dangerous to store a large amount of fuel for an extended period of time. Using the sun on sunny days and the Sun Oven® as a wonder box (or retained heat cooker) on cloudy days reduces the amount of fuel you need to store.
  5. First Aid - Heat water for cleaning wounds and personal hygiene & sterilize medical instruments.

 The Sun Oven® in Action

Sun Oven - eggs

Sun Oven - bread

Sun Oven - drying veggies

September 2013, Every Needful Thing                             Billie A. Nicholson

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