General Purpose Weed Killer

SimpleWeedkillerThere are lots of references for natural weed killers.

One inexpensive herbicide is a combination of vinegar and dish soap. Apply this treatment on a sunny day. The acetic acid in vinegar will burn the weed leaves on contact and lower the pH of the soil, making recovery difficult.

To a gallon of vinegar, add a teaspoon of liquid dish soap,

which helps the vinegar stick to the plant leaves. If you plan to use the area treated for something other than plants, you can add 1/2 cup of salt as well. This will add a final blow to the ground. Remember in history and Bible classes, reading about how a conquerer salted the fields? Just in case there were battle survivors, plants would not grow for some time and the survivors would starve.

IL GUANTE DE MUERTO! (GREAT Gardening Tip!)


Mel Morganstein

Do you have nasty, woody, deep rooted weeds

growing in your garden amongst all the other plants you want to keep? I’m talking about the ones with taproots so deep you can’t pull them out, or even dig down to the end of the root to loosen it enough to yank! Some have roots longer than the length of plant above the ground. The problem too is that they are so close to desirable plants you simply cannot spray them with weed killer either! And for these plants you need poison ivy or “woody” weed killer and you need to somehow apply this ONLY to that plant.

“Guante de Muerto”

Here is the trick I came up with that I call my “Guante de Muerto” or “Glove of Death!” You need to mix up a small necked quart bottle of WOODY weed or POISON IVY or BRUSH killer, you can even make it a bit concentrated! For safety, I put a latex surgical type glove on my left hand, followed by a disposable polyethylene glove. THEN I put on only one left absorbent COTTON glove. They are very inexpensive! (All right handed if you are a lefty) Now, go out into the garden and pour some of the weed killer into your left glove to soak the palm and lightly grasp the stem of the plant you want to kill near the base. Carefully pull your hand up along the length of the plant, coating the undersides of "Guante de Muerto"

the leaves with the brush killer solution. You don’t want to grasp it so tightly that you strip the leaves off, but you need to coat the leaves because these herbicides by being ABSORBED INTO THE PLANT BY THE LEAVES!. The herbicide is distributed by the plant through its system and kills everything, roots and all. The neat thing about the Guante de Muerto (which has kind of a ring to it!) is that if you are careful, you are ONLY applying the killer to the plant you want to kill! You can keep reusing the glove. Be sure to extensively wash your hands when you are done!

Honey, More than Just a Sweetener

honeyHoney is a viscous sweetener

made naturally by bees, from the nectar of plants, for their own consumption. After collection, the bees regurgitate the nectar into hexagonal-sided honeycomb cells made of wax and stored inside a bee hive. The constant fanning by the bees’ wings cause evaporation creating the sweet liquid we call honey. The color and flavor of honey will vary based on the flower nectar collected. Beekeepers harvest honey by collecting the honeycomb frames and scraping off the wax cap made by the bees to seal the honey in each cell.  Spinning the frames in a centrifuge extracts the liquid from each cell.

It is a versatile food staple and with a little care, can be stored indefinitely. Honey found in Egyptian tombs was still good after 2,000 years. Consider adding it to your emergency supplies.

Raw honey,

processed with a minimal amount of heat, contains many phytonutrients which provide anti-bacterial, anti-viral and anti-fungal properties. There are three key health benefits: it is a natural energy booster,  a great immune system builder, and  a natural remedy for many ailments

When you use it in cooking instead of sugar, reduce the amount by 1/2, reduce liquid by 1/4 cup and reduce cooking temperature 25º.

As a remedy for ailments, it can be used for hangovers, sore throats, sleeplessness, and cuts and burns. Mix it with vinegar for a self-detox, with cinnamon for bad breath and hair loss, and with milk to improve digestion. Do not feed it to babies less than a year old because of the danger of botulism.

Recent declines in honey bee populations

have researchers looking for causes. Their results show a complex mix of pesticide and fungicide exposure and bee pathogens as the problem.  Some regulatory agencies are considering stricter controls on agricultural chemicals used as part of the solution.

Billie Nicholson

Electricity – Our Constant Companion or Our Worst Enemy

This article was contributed by Robert Nicholson of Rusty Buggy Enterprises, Inc.

We are slaves of electricity.

It might appear that Edison wrangled electricity into submission —giving us usable power.  Almost every facet of contemporary society is dictated by the properties of electricity. Ever since the first commercial light bulb and the telegraph, electricity has ruled the lives of men.

The reach of electric-powered devices and machines is unbelievably vast. With modern robots, there is almost nothing that electricity can’t do. The amount of work performed by electricity is beyond belief. From growing crops to preparing food, from making computer chips to manufacturing cars, electrical powered machines do much work that would otherwise have to be done by humans.

What is an Electromagnetic Pulse?

Just for a moment, suspend your scientific beliefs and imagine that electricity suddenly ceased to exist. Waking up, your alarm wouldn’t work. Unless you have a gas grill, you can say goodbye to your morning toast. Your car wouldn’t start. Trains and busses would useless. Automatic doors at the entrance to your office, school, or favorite coffee shop would remain shut. Prison cells would spring open. Elevators would not operate. Your PC, your wireless router, your digital camera, your smartphone — all computers everywhere would be dead. No telephone, radio or TV. Forget cable. No batteries either. The list is endless.
Enter the “Electromagnetic Pulse” or EMP. An EMP event can be either natural, such as solar flares and lightning strikes, or an EMP can be man-made by the detonation of a bomb. Whatever the cause of an EMP, it can disrupt electrical communications and electric power. Also all people wearing pacemakers will be affected. Modern vehicles, full of electronics, will stop working. In the past, EMP events have ruined telegraph equipment, disrupted radio signals, and taken down the internet for short periods of time. Military EMP events can be used to disable enemy electronics causing power outages, water systems to fail, and communications to fail. An EMP may well be the method employed as a  future attack on America.

How would you prepare to overcome an EMP?

There is a simple way to do this. Buy or build a Faraday box, named after Michael Faraday, who discovered electromagnetic induction in 1831. The Faraday box is a metal enclosure, like a galvanized trash can, with a tight fitting lid. This shields the contents from an EMP event. You need to line the interior of the enclosure with insulation, such as styrofoam, cardboard, or the like. You can also wrap each piece inside your Faraday box with bubble wrap. During an EMP the electromagnetic waves are absorbed by the metal case and not transmitted to the interior because of the installed insulation.

We have a surplus metal cabinet with tight fitting doors. We store a set of two-way radios, with batteries, a few solar battery chargers, a world band radio, a solar radio, radiation monitor and the like in our Faraday box. If I had a motor scooter, or old car, I would also store an extra condenser for the motor in my Faraday box. We also have outfitted a 15 gallon galvanized feed can as a Faraday box. You can get one at the local hardware store for around $20.00.  Follow the same procedure, wrapping and insulating each piece of electronics you store. Be ready.

Electromagnetic Pulseelectromagnetic pulse   electromagnetic pulse

 

5 Food Storages Lies to Watch Out For

Thanks to Jeff at LPC Survival for contributing this article. 

LPC_5_Food_Storage_Lies-300x300I have noticed a trend over the last few years when it comes to food storage,  A lot of companies are claiming anything in order to get your business. I wanted to expose these things as food storage lies, whether intentional or not. At the very least, they are misleading claims, but having received many calls and emails from food storage companies, I had to share this list of what I see as food storage lies or misleading statements when it comes to purchasing long term food storage.

Lie #1: “Our dehydrated pouched Food Storage meals last 25 years.”

The most prolific of all the lies, this one doesn’t reveal the fact that the food must be stored at 55 degrees or less at all times. The chances of you storing it at 55 degrees is extremely rare.  They don’t even put this on their web sites, and won’t even tell you on the phone.  Once you get the bucket, you will see the fine print.  Some may not even have this fact on the bucket when you get it.  Also, one Food Storage company who claims a 25 year shelf life has even admitted to me that they use the claim just to be “competitive.” Integrity should be the first thing a company stands by. I have seen reputable companies offer Freeze dried food in pouches and only claim 10-12 year shelf life. That is what I look for.
Lie #2: “Our Food Storage is Non-GMO.”
If any company says that, I would specifically ask them for what certifications they have.  Then have them email you the certifications. Don’t let them say I will get back to you, demand to see them before placing your order. If they have a USDA Organic Certification or another reputable GMO testing certification, then they have something to back up the claim. Buyer Beware on this Claim, be sure to see the evidence.
Lie #3: “Our Food Storage is Gluten Free.”
    This is mostly done over the phone, but I have seen it on some of their web sites. This claim goes a long with the Non-GMO claim, ask for certifications and make sure they are from organizations that you find reputable. Ask for certifications before thinking about purchasing any of their food storage. I also recommend calling the certification companies, and talking with them about the process.  Your health could be at stake, I recommend being extremely cautious of any food storage company that claims Gluten Free.  Making Gluten Free food can be pricy, so if the prices are low or comparable to their regular meals,  I would look elsewhere.
Lie #4: “Our Pouches are nitrogen flushed and have an oxygen absorber in them, which helps them last 25 years.”
While the first part of this claim is true, the 2nd part is not. They can also say they double or triple nitrogen flush the pouches, its all marketing.  Also, check Lie #1 for their claim of 25 years.

(If you are unfamiliar with nitrogen flushing, here is a basic description of what it is:
Nitrogen flushing is a type of preservation method used with packaged foods such as coffee beans, nuts, rice cakes, snack crackers and chips. When you go to the grocery store to buy a bag of chips, you’ll probably notice the bag is puffed and filled with ‘air.’ But it’s not exactly like the air we breathe because the package doesn’t contain oxygen.
When processed food is exposed to oxygen, it deteriorates – oils go rancid, discoloration occurs and the food spoils. Oxygen can be removed from the packaging by removing all of the air with a vacuum, which will increase the shelf life of the food packed inside.)

Lie #5: “We have Celebrity and Radio personalities that endorse our products”
These are paid endorsements and some of them are very costly endorsements. I wonder if these people have even tried the meals which they endorse, as they seem to mimic each other when the ads run.  Don’t fall for the marketing, if there is a high profile endorsement, I personally won’t buy it.
Lastly, there are reputable food storage companies and organizations to buy food storage from. The ones I personally purchase are either 100% freeze dried, USDA Organic, or minimally processed. I avoid dehydrated Meals because I have seen that they are highly processed.

Be sure to check the list above before falling for what I call: “Food Storage Lies”.       -Jeff

LPC Survival have helped thousands of people get better prepared. Visit them at LPC Survival      Reproduced with Permission

I Can Sleep Through Anything

There is a story of the farmer who needed to take on a new person to help keep his farm operating. He placed a notice at the local store and soon had several young men apply for the position. The farmer interviewed them one by one, ending the session by asking each of them what he does best. When the farmer interviewed the last lad his answer to the last question was, “I can sleep through anything.” He was intrigued by the young man’s answer, so he hired the lad on the spot.

Time went by and one night a big storm suddenly developed. The farmer ran to the bunkhouse and to get his new farmhand to help secure the farm and animals. He was furious to find him sound asleep. When he finally was able to wake him, the lad reminded the farmer that, “he could sleep through anything.”

Upon inspection of the farm, the farmer discovered that the animals were safely placed in the barn, the hay and farm equipment were covered and tied down, and all was well. After traveling the length of his property, the farmer understood why the farm hand could say, “I can sleep through anything.”  The farm hand had done what it took to be prepared.

Are you prepared for a short or long-term emergency? Remember, knowledge trumps equipment and working together makes life better.

As we approach the holiday season, let us consider how we can give gifts of ourselves to one another: the best present you can give is one of your presence in the lives of those you love.

Sleep through anythingHappy Holidays

From

Sun Oven International

 

Burning a Wood Fire Safely

wood fire safely

Image: photobucket albums

Keeping warm in cold weather without electricity may mean burning wood. This can be done in a fireplace directly or by using a wood burning stove. These are designed to safely burn wood fuel and provide heat for your shelter. They are connected to chimneys responsible for removing the by-products of combustion, including smoke, gases, tar fog, and water vapor, among other things. As the combustibles exit through the cooler chimney, they condense on the inside. This residue is know as creosote. It is very combustible and when ignited will burn at extremely high temperatures and may damage the chimney, spread through mortar cracks into the

wooden structure of your home, and even spew sparks igniting the roof. To avoid a home fire disaster, the Chimney Safety Institute of America (CSIA) offers the following safety tips:

  • Get your chimney checked and cleaned annually to reduce the risk of fires and carbon monoxide poisonings due to creosote buildup or chimney obstructions.
  • Keep overhanging tree branches at least 15 feet away from the top of chimney.
  • Install a chimney cap to keep debris and animals out.
  • Choose well seasoned wood, split for at least 6 months. Store it in a covered and raised location, away from your home foundation. Do not burn Christmas trees, cardboard, wrapping paper.
  • Keep the area around your hearth clear. Keep furniture at least three feet away from the hearth.
  • Install a metal mesh screen in front of fireplaces that do not have glass doors. This controls sparks.
  • When building a fire, place the firewood or fire-logs in the back of the fireplace on a supporting grate. Leave air space when stacking multiple logs, so the fire can breathe. Use kindling or a commercial fire starter to ignite your fire. Never use flammable liquids. Build smaller, hotter fires that burn more completely and produce less smoke.
  • The by-product of burning wood is ash. Softwoods make more ash than hardwoods. Leaving a one inch layer of ash in your stove will make it easier to build and maintain a fire. Hot coals nestling in the ash add more heat to the fuel and reflect heat back into the fire. Ash also protects the floor of your firebox. Do not remove hot ash from you firebox and put it into a paper bag or any other flammable container. Take all ash outside. At the end of heating season, ash should be removed to reduce moisture absorption, which rusts metal parts. Save the ash to add to your garden next spring.
  • Install smoke and carbon monoxide detectors. Place detectors in several locations throughout the house, putting one outside your bedroom door. Check these batteries twice a year. Over 200 people die each year from carbon monoxide poisoning caused by problems in the venting of toxic gases, produced by heating systems. (U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission). This number may be much higher because the symptoms of prolonged, low-level carbon monoxide poisoning mimic other common winter ailments (headaches, nausea, dizziness, fatigue and seasonal depression). Too much carbon monoxide in your blood will kill you. The protein, hemoglobin, in our blood will attach a carbon monoxide molecule and ignore an oxygen molecule. This attachment causes cell suffocation. Even low-level exposure can cause permanent brain and organ damage. Infants, those with blood or heart disorders, and the elderly are the most susceptible.
  • Never leave a fire unattended. Learn how to keep your wood stove fire burning during the night.
  • If you have a chimney fire, discontinue use of your chimney until it can be inspected and deemed safe to use.

For More Info: http://www.csia.org/homeowner-resources and http://www.naturalhandyman.com/iip/infchimneyfire/infchimneyfire.html

Handling Roadside Emergencies

When you are planning a trip in your auto, take time to check your vehicle. In addition to cleaning out the trash, check the windshield washer fluid, oil, water/anti-freeze level in the radiator, and tire inflation. Remember to double check your emergency car kit, updating food and water and adding extra clothing based on the type of weather you expect to travel through. If you have a cell phone, pack it and the charger. Check your wallet for cash and any roadside emergency membership card you may have. Always maintain a half-full tank of gas. Before you leave, contact someone at your destination to let them know your estimated time of arrival.

Once you are on the road, pay attention to your vehicle’s performance, listening for any odd sounds and look for any odd emissions. Once I was traveling home late. I noticed white smoke coming from my exhaust and looked down at the dash to see the temperature needle pegged to overheating. The radiator hose had burst.

If you have a breakdown, use the car’s momentum to get it off the road safely. Try to get over as far as possible to remove your vehicle from on-coming traffic. Put on the emergency flashers. Exit the car from the passenger side door. If you can’t get off the road, set up any warning signals you have, like flares or hazard triangle, as far behind as practical to give other motorists notice to get around you.

Raise your vehicle hood and leave it up, Get out your HELP sign or white cloth. Place it in the window. Use your cell phone, if you have one with service, to contact law enforcement. Calling 911 will put you in contact with help. Your cell phone may or may not have a GPS tracking device installed, so you will need to be able to tell the 911 operator where you are. A mile marker or landmark is helpful.

Stay with your vehicle, if possible, especially at night or in bad weather. Wait for a uniformed law enforcement officer to arrive. Rely on the items in your road-side emergency kit to keep you hydrated, warm and entertained while you wait for assistance to arrive.

Keep doors and windows locked. If someone stops to assist you, crack the window and ask them to contact law enforcement. Use your best judgment accepting help from strangers.

When help arrives, if you are out of your vehicle discussing details, be sure to stand away from the vehicles, not in between them. Many people have been injured or worse when another driver has hit the back vehicle, driving the two together, crushing or amputating legs.

If you must walk, write down your name, date, time you left the vehicle and the direction you were going. Leave it on the dash. Walk facing traffic, if there are no sidewalks. If you accept a ride from a stranger, write down the plate number of the vehicle, a description of the driver and vehicle, in addition. Leave this information on the dash. As soon as possible notify law enforcement of the location and condition of your vehicle.car emergency kit

Read More:

http://www.doityourself.com/stry/roadsidebreakdowns#.UpkA9ii2wqA

http://www.davereedinsurance.com/the-importance-of-an-emergency-car-kit

Winterize Your Car Emergency Kit

Holidays are the time of year when much long distance traveling is done. Going home to visit families, often leaving after work in the dark, and frequently encountering bad weather, can put travelers in jeopardy.  Add to that the fact that tires can get punctures, gas tanks can get empty and engines can overheat when you least expect it. Having a road side emergency kit in your car at all times will often save you time and money, and may even save your life. We’ve expanded Edmunds.com’s extensive list of items to keep in your vehicle. Make sure that you include items to keep you and your passengers warm in case your break down leaves you stranded in the cold. Some of the basic items include:

  • 12-foot jumper cables
  • Four 15-minute roadside flares
  • Two quarts of oil and Gallon of antifreeze
  • First aid kit (including an assortment of bandages, gauze, adhesive tape, antiseptic cream, instant ice and heat compresses, scissors and aspirin)
  • Wool blanket or sleeping bag
  • Extra clothes and boots/shoes (for winter: coat, hat gloves and scarf)
  • Extra fuses
  • Flashlight and extra batteries, lighted headband or lighted brimmed cap
  • Tools to include:Flat head screwdrivers, Phillips head screwdrivers, Pliers, Vise Grips, Adjustable wrench
  • Tire inflator (such as a Fix-A-Flat) and Tire pressure gauge
  • Rags and Roll of paper towels
  • plastic garbage bags for trash and to help insulate feet
  • A couple of old newspapers to use for insulation under coats
  • Roll of duct tape and Roll of reflective tape for visibility
  • Windshield washer fluid and Anti-freeze
  • Pocketknife
  • Ice scraper and kitty litter or sand for tire traction
  • fire extinguisher (5 pound, A-B-C type)
  • tow rope or chain
  • Whistle, compass and Road maps
  • Dollar bills and quarters, dimes and nickels
  • Toilet paper and paper towels
  • gas can, 2 gallon size plus funnel & short hose for siphoning
  • hand warmer packs
  • Pen and paper and Help sign or strip of white cloth
  • Cell phone & charger
  • Granola or energy bars – dried fruit, peanut butter crackers, canned goods; remember a manual can opener and basic eating utensils
  • Bottled water – a case or a gallon as fits
  • Book, puzzle or other non-battery operated item to pass the time
  • Heavy-duty nylon bag or two to carry it all

The most important tip is to familiarize yourself with all the items in your car road-side emergency kit, how you have them arranged, and how to use them properly.

http://www.edmunds.com/how-to/how-to-create-your-own-roadside-emergency-kit.html

Calling 9-1-1

Everyone should know what to in an Emergency.  Whenever there is an emergency, use the following tips to help decide if you should call 9-1-1 (or local emergency number) for an ambulance.

911 should be called IMMEDIATELY for any emergency which is threatening to life, health, safety, or property. This includes crimes in progress, medical problems, suspicious persons or activities. Fire emergencies, criminal offenses, drug activity, and domestic problems should also be promptly reported to 9-1-1.

Non-emergency requests for service should be directed to an administrative number. Add your local number to your emergency contacts. Listen to the recorded options and select the line # for non emergency. Stay on the line until a dispatcher answers.

 

Call if victim…

… is trapped

… is not responding or is passed out

… is bleeding badly or bleeding cannot be stopped

… has a cut or wound so bad and deep that you can see bone or muscles

… has a body part missing or is torn away

… has pain below the rib cage that does not go away

… is peeing, pooping or puking blood (called passing blood)

… is breathing weird or having trouble breathing

… seems to have hurt their head, neck or back

… is jerking uncontrollably (called having a seizure)

… has broken bones and cannot be moved carefully

… acts like they had a heart attack (chest pain or pressure)

… If you call 9-1-1 there may be a recording or delay while your call is being processed. DO NOT HANG UP — wait for a 9-1-1 dispatcher.

When you talk to 9-1-1 or the emergency number…

… try to stay CALM and describe what happened and what is wrong with the victim

… give the location of the emergency, your name and the phone number you are calling from

… follow their instructions in case they tell you what to do for the victim

… do NOT hang up until the 9-1-1 operator tells you to.

Since you are calling from a cell phone, your call may be disconnected if the signal is lost. Be sure to call back if you are cut off.

… When calling 9-1-1 on a cellular phone, be sure to stop if you are in a moving vehicle. It is difficult to obtain all of the information needed if you are getting further from the emergency.

Calling 9-1-1

by Bill and Janet Liebsch

… Your call may need to be transferred to another agency because cell phone calls are sent to a 9-1-1 answering point based on cell radio coverage. Cell coverage areas don’t always match political boundaries, so most calls are routed to a 9-1-1 answering point that serves the majority of the area.

 

Reproduced with Permission:

http://www.ItsaDisaster.net  from “It’s a Disaster …and what are YOU gonna do about it?”, by Bill and Janet Liebsch

 

Morgan County, TN ”911 Tips” version of above

 

TIPS ON GOOD SAMARITAN LAWS

     The definition of a “Samaritan” is a charitable or helpful person. Most states have Good Samaritan laws that were designed to protect citizens who try to help injured victims with emergency care. If a citizen uses “logical” or “rational” actions while making wise or careful decisions during an emergency situation then they can be protected from being sued.

To learn more about your state’s Good Samaritan laws, check with your local library, search the web or contact an attorney.

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